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Not sure if there is any name for this algorithm I'm currently developing - "growing neighbourhood algorithm" sounds like an appropriate name. So what is my problem about?

I would like to draw a stroke around an alpha transparent image to outline it. The size of the stroke should be user-definable.

I have an array which is filled by zeros and ones, consider each item of the array as a cell like in Game of Life. An item with 0 is empty (transparent pixel), an item with 1 is a first generation cell (non transparent pixel), the number of generations is defined by the size of the surrounding stroke.

This example depicts an rectangle surrounded by alpha values:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Then I would like to let the ones grow a new generation by surrounding every 0-generation Moore neighbour. It's the second generation (stroke with 1px) - thus the array looks after growing as follows:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3rd and 4th generation (stroke with 3px):

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4
4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 4
4 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 4
4 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 4
4 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 4
4 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 4
4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 4
4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

So far so good. I'm achieving this simple task by the following code snippet:

for (int gen = 1; gen <= 4; gen++)
{
    for (int x = 1; x < arrayWidth - 1; x++)
    {
        for (int y = 1; y < arrayHeight - 1; y++)
        {
            // See if this cell is in the current generation.
            if (_generation[x + arrayWidth * y] == gen)
            {
                // Generate next generation.
                for (int i = x - 1; i <= x + 1; i++)
                {
                    for (int j = y - 1; j <= y + 1; j++)
                    {
                        if (_generation[i + arrayWidth * j] == 0 || _generation[i + arrayWidth * j] > gen)
                        {
                            _generation[i + arrayWidth * j] = gen + 1;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This approach works perfectly for simple shapes like a rectangle for example. But how can I do this for an ellipse? As soon as we have kind of a stair pattern in the cells, I'm getting messy results:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0
0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0
0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0
0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0
0 0 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 0 0
0 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 0
3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3
3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3
3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3
0 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 0
0 0 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 0 0
0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0

When applying this algorithm to an ellipse, the outline looks kinda weird because of this problem (left: algorithm result, right: requested result):

Algorithm result (left), requested result (right)

The problem here is that I do not want have those 2 2 and 3 3 duplicate blocks which occur every time I have this "stair" pattern:

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

I want the above 2nd and 3rd generation calculations look like this:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0
0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0
0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 0 0 0
0 0 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 0 0
0 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 0
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3
0 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 0
0 0 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 0 0
0 0 0 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0

I've tried numerous methods to filter out those duplicate cell blocks, but I can't find an easy and generic solution for solving the problem.

Any ideas how to get stroke/outline like I get from Photoshop or Paint.NET?

Thanks!

Cheers P

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2  
I think that you might make progress by morphological dilation with an appropriate structuring element. I don't have time to explain in any detail, while you wait for an answer, start reading at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_morphology –  High Performance Mark Oct 2 '12 at 9:39
    
Your question should be an example to everyone - "How to ask good questions" –  Andrey Oct 2 '12 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The proper name is dilation, check out morphological operations. You should try dilation with circle element, this will give you the requested result.

Here is a Matlab code that shows how it is done:

im = imcircle(70);
im = padarray(im,[20,20]);
figure;imshow(im);
im2 = imdilate(im,strel('disk',8));
figure;imshow(im2);

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
2  
This is exactly what I'm searching for! Thanks! Knowing the name of this algorithm makes researching much easier... ;) Some very useful links: homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/rbf/HIPR2/dilate.htm Also the Matlab reference for choosing an appropriate kernel: mathworks.de/de/help/images/ref/strel.html –  barnacleboy Oct 2 '12 at 13:33

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