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The problem is that id, start and end are getting the value 2 inside updateLine. I can see this while debugging the code in Zend Studio. What is the reason for this?

UPDATE: I need to be able to parse string values to the function updateLine.

include_once 'include/connect_db.php';

$id = '2230';
$start = '2012-10-02 11:36:13';
$end = '2012-10-02 11:36:13';

$size = count($id);
var_dump($size);

for($i = 0; $i < $size; $i++){
updateLine($id[$i], $start[$i], $end[$i]);
}

function updateLine($id, $start, $end){
    var_dump($id);
    var_dump($start);
    $sql = "UPDATE `Sequence` 
            SET start='" . $start . "', fin='" . $end . "' 
            WHERE id='" . $id . "'";    
    $result=execute_query($sql);
    var_dump($sql);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Because $id, $start and $end in your call are handled as char arrays. What do you want to do exactly? Please elaborate a bit. –  Christian Ivicevic Oct 2 '12 at 9:52
    
$id $start $end are not arrays, but you treat them as arrays? –  JvdBerg Oct 2 '12 at 9:52
    
@JvdBerg Originally they are arrays. I just simplified the example. –  You Kuper Oct 2 '12 at 9:52
2  
@YouKuper: You example does not make any sense. –  nkr Oct 2 '12 at 9:53
    
Then you are getting the results you are currently because you didn't remove the subscript operators from your updateLine parameters. –  slugonamission Oct 2 '12 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've just tested and I get no errors with the following code :

$id = array('2230', '2245');
$start = array('2012-10-02 11:36:13', '2012-10-15 11:36:13');
$end = array('2012-10-02 11:36:23', '2012-10-15 11:36:23');

$size = count($id);
var_dump($size);

for($i = 0; $i < $size; $i++){
    updateLine($id[$i], $start[$i], $end[$i]);
}

function updateLine($id, $start, $end){
    $sql = "UPDATE `Sequence` 
            SET start='" . $start . "', fin='" . $end . "' 
            WHERE id='" . $id . "'";    
    $result=execute_query($sql);
}
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The [] operator accesses the i-th character of a string. i is 0, so you get 2, 2, and 2 for the three values.

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You are trying to call updateLine($id[$i], $start[$i], $end[$i]) which is completely weird. Just call it without the for loop and without the index like that updateLine($id, $start, $end) and you are good to go. Otherwise, as stated in my comment you only have a string (=char array) and access char by char with the indexing operator [] which was mentioned by other people, too.

Only if you plan to store different values in arrays like $id = array("trololo", "blabla") you should iterate over them like you did in the first place.

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Because $id, $start, $end aren't array and array access to non array's results almost in unexpected results

You have to use something like this

$id = array('2230');
$start = array('2012-10-02 11:36:13');
$end = array('2012-10-02 11:36:13');

or remove the for loop

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes they are. Strings can be accessed as character arrays (and traditionally were implemented as arrays of characters). Treating them as arrays is completely defined. –  slugonamission Oct 2 '12 at 9:52
    
Yes it is, but in most cases this happen by accident –  Philipp Oct 2 '12 at 9:55

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