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var fn = function() {


    this.method1 = function() {

        return this.public;
    };


    this.method2 = function() {

        return {

            init: function() { return this.public; }
        }
    };


    fn.prototype.public = "method prototype";
};

create object fn

var object = new fn();

object.method1() // "method prototype"

object.method2().init(); // undefined 

this.public Prototype in method2().init() function run return undefined ?

Is there an alternative to Prototype? thank you.

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why -1 ? just asked you a question? –  Yaşar İÇLİ Oct 2 '12 at 10:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is related to the different scope in which this is bound on init function of method2(), so try this:

this.method2 = function() {
    var self = this;      
    return {
        init: function() { return self.public; }
    }
};

so

object.method2().init(); // return "method prototype"
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This this in the init function is the object returned by object.method2(), which has no public property on it.

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There is a lot wrong with this.

But the direct answer to your specific question is that calling init returns undefined because its reference to this is to the inner object that you've created and not the instance that you think it refers to.

I suggest you stop trying to solve this particular problem and learn the basics of prototypal inheritance in JavaScript

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Also, I know it's only example code, but public is a reserved keyword in JavaScript even though it's not actually used. Avoid using reserved words as identifiers –  Tim Oct 2 '12 at 10:32
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