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Inside linux kernel sources i see that, inside enums, is there also a define with the same name of enum element. Example in linux/rtnetlink.h we have:

enum {
        RTM_BASE        = 16,
#define RTM_BASE        RTM_BASE

        RTM_NEWLINK     = 16,
#define RTM_NEWLINK     RTM_NEWLINK
        RTM_DELLINK,
#define RTM_DELLINK     RTM_DELLINK
...

What is the reason for this? I can't figure out how this is used.

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another guess: this macro could allow renaming an entry of the enum without breaking other code. Change

enum {
        RTM_BASE        = 16,
#define RTM_BASE        RTM_BASE

to

enum {
        RTM_BASE_NEW_NEW_NEW        = 16,
#define RTM_BASE        RTM_BASE_NEW_NEW_NEW

A user could still use RTM_BASE.

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RTM_BASE = RTM_BASE_NEW_NEW_NEW would work just as well, without the define. –  Bo Persson Oct 2 '12 at 16:56
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One thing I could think of is that you can check for the very existence of the enum by means of the macro:

#ifdef RTM_BASE
int flag = RTMBASE;
#else
int flag = 0;
#endif

No idea if that's what's going on, though.

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Yes, that's exactly what I was going to write after I finished my sandwich. It's the only purpose I can see this really serving –  Keldon Alleyne Oct 2 '12 at 10:39
    
Useful! But looking at the sources, it seems that defines are not used in this way. Thank you. –  MirkoBanchi Oct 2 '12 at 12:14
1  
It wouldn't make sense to do this in the kernel sources, but it does make sense in user-space applications that might need to work on multiple kernel versions, where capabilities may or may not be present. –  Lance Richardson Oct 2 '12 at 13:54
1  
You can find examples in e.g. ISC ntpd sources at isc.org/software/ntp. –  Lance Richardson Oct 2 '12 at 14:06
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Another thing these #defines achieve, besides allowing old code to continue the old names should the enum constant names be changed, and checking whether they are defined, is to prevent other code to define these symbols.

#include <linux/rtnetlink.h>
// for some reason, the author thinks
#define RTM_BASE 17.3f
// is a good idea

would not compile.

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