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Yes I know why we always round to the nearest even number if we are in the exact middle (i.e. 2.5 becomes 2) of two numbers. But when I want to evaluate data for some people they don't want this behaviour. What is the simplest method to get this

x <- seq(0.5,9.5,by=1)
round(x)

to be 1,2,3,...,10 and not 0,2,2,4,4,...,10.

Edit: To clearify: 1.4999 should be 1 after rounding. (I thought this would be obvious)

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Am I right in thinking you want values <= 0.4 to round to 0 and values >= 0.5 to round to 1? –  Michael Allen Oct 2 '12 at 10:45
6  
The correct answer is: Teach these people that they're biasing their data. Sadly, I know from my own experience that's well-nigh impossible. –  Carl Witthoft Oct 2 '12 at 11:18
    
@CarlWitthoft, are they really? Can you elaborate? That round maps n + .5 to n seems arbitrary to me. –  flodel Oct 2 '12 at 11:46
3  
It is easy to simulate. Based on the sequence x from above try mean(x); mean(round(x)); mean(floor(0.5 + x)). Of course this does not proof anything as this could be only a special case. But look at this this way: If we round every x.5 up of course our rounded data than is biased. If we round down every second x.5 we counter this effect. That's why we round to the next even number. –  jakob r Oct 2 '12 at 11:58
5  
Not to mention that "rounding to the even digit" is the IEC 60559 standard as mentioned in ?round . –  Carl Witthoft Oct 2 '12 at 13:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is not my own function, and unfortunately, I can't find where I got it at the moment (originally found as an anonymous comment at the Statistically Significant blog), but it should help with what you need.

round2 = function(x, n) {
  posneg = sign(x)
  z = abs(x)*10^n
  z = z + 0.5
  z = trunc(z)
  z = z/10^n
  z*posneg
}

x is the object you want to round, and n is the number of digits you are rounding to.

An Example

x = c(1.85, 1.54, 1.65, 1.85, 1.84)
round(x, 1)
# [1] 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.8
round2(x, 1)
# [1] 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.9 1.8
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1  
+1 - Very nice, I only realize now that your answer is a generalization of mine. Maybe you should have used n=0 in your example, even set it as default in your function. Also note that it handles negative numbers differently: round2(-0.5, 0) gives -1 while my method will return 0. –  flodel Oct 2 '12 at 11:15
1  
@flodel, Unfortunately, I can't take credit for the function. I honestly didn't know there were so many different ways of rounding until I had encountered R's round-to-even behavior and did some reading up on the topic. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 2 '12 at 12:42

If you want something that behaves exactly like round except for those xxx.5 values, try this:

> x <- seq(0, 1, 0.1)
> x
 [1] 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0
> floor(0.5 + x)
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1
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So simple that I am a little suspicous. –  jakob r Oct 2 '12 at 10:59
1  
@jakobr It's relies on you wanting to only round to whole numbers, rather than any other power of 10 –  James Oct 2 '12 at 11:02
    
You could also use sign(x)*floor(abs(x)+ 0.5) if you want to do rounding "away" from 0 and it's possible you have negative values. –  Dason Jul 16 at 16:46

This appears to work:

rdn <- function(x) trunc(x+sign(x)*0.5)

... tho, Ananda Mahto's response seems to do this and more - I am not sure what the extra code in his response is accounting for; or, in other words, I can't figure out how to break this rnd() function defined here.

Example:

x = c(1.85, 1.54, 1.65, -1.85, 1.84)
round(x, 1)
# [1] 1.8 1.5 1.6 -1.8 1.8
rnd(x, 1)
# [1] 1.9 1.5 1.7 -1.9 1.8
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1  
Did you post your entire function? The rdn function you posted only takes one argument (the input vector) but you show it being used with two arguments. The function I've posted tries to address rounding to other place values as well. For instance, compare the difference between round(x, 2) and round2(x, 2) when x = c(1.855, 1.545, 1.655, 1.855, 1.845). –  Ananda Mahto Sep 24 '13 at 2:18

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