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I'm working on my first WPF/MVVM project and I'm having a hard time wrapping my brain around a few things. This project is going to be a standalone application of something that has already been made in VB, so all the logic and business rules already exist.

The problem I've come across is trying to implement the binding. I have several buttons on my application, and all of their properties (IsEnabled, Text, image) are dependent on an enum. The enum is based on status and exists in the Model.

In the VB application, I had a massive switch statement to refresh the properties of the buttons and it was called in every single place the status might change. So for this version, I have a bool and string for each button in my ViewModel based on the status, but have no way to force it to update every time the status has been changed (which is quite frequently).

I've read a bit about INotifyPropertyChanged, but the property that needs to kick off the changes in my ViewModel is in my Model. Am I going about this the wrong way?

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1  
Definitely use I(Multi)ValueConverter(s), don't clutter your ViewModel with buttons' visibility/enabled state. –  Baboon Oct 2 '12 at 13:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to bind the IsEnabled, Text, and Image properties for each Button to the viewmodel's Status property. You will then need to provide 3 implementations of the IValueConverter which essentially translates the Status enum value into the appropriate bool, string, or image that you are looking for. For each Button control, provide an additional parameter that the converter can use to compare against the viewmodel's Status property.

Something like this:

<myView.Resources>
    <local:statToBoolConverter x:Key="statToBoolConv" />
    <local:statToTextConverter x:Key="statToTextConv" />
    <local:statToImgConverter x:Key="statToImgConv" />
</myView.Resources>

// ..... further down in code ....

<Button x:Key="aButton" 
    IsEnabled="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToBoolConv}, 
        ConverterParamter=caseA}"
    Text="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToTextConv}, 
        ConverterParamter=caseA}"
    Image="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToImgConv},
        ConverterParamter=caseA}"/>

<Button x:Key="aButton" 
    IsEnabled="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToBoolConv}, 
        ConverterParamter=caseB}"
    Text="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToTextConv}, 
        ConverterParamter=caseB}"
    Image="{Binding Path=Status, Converter={StaticResource statToImgConv},
        ConverterParamter=caseB}"/>

I'm not going to include the specifics of implementing an IValueConverter since it's very straightforward, but you can get more information on that here (complete with example):

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.data.ivalueconverter.aspx

One more note: INotifyPropertyChanged will trigger binding updates for all of the buttons, so making a single NotifyPropertyChanged("MyStatus") call will do the trick.

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Thank you so much @code4life! Implemented an IMultiValueConverter and it did the job perfectly :D –  sporkful Oct 8 '12 at 14:33

I would use a DataTrigger in your Button's Style. Whenever the bound value gets updated, the DataTrigger is re-evaluated and new values are set if necessary

<Style x:Key="MyButtonStyle" TargetType="{x:Type Button}">
    <Style.Triggers>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding MyEnumProperty}" 
                     Value="{x:Static local:MyEnum.Value1}">
            <Setter Property="IsEnabled" Value="False" />
            <Setter Property="Content" Value="Value 1" />
        </DataTrigger>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding MyEnumProperty}" 
                     Value="{x:Static local:MyEnum.Value2}">
            <Setter Property="IsEnabled" Value="True" />
        </DataTrigger>
    </Style.Triggers>
</Style>

You would do the same thing with your Image style - Set the Image.Source property in a DataTrigger based on what the current value of the Status enum is.

Just keep in mind that your MyEnumProperty needs to raise a PropertyChange notification when it changes so the UI knows the value has changed and to update any bindings that rely on that value.

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+1 for the {x:Static ... bit - that was the missing key for me when trying to bind my binding value to an enum value. Thanks! –  Jon Peterson Feb 26 at 20:03

I've tried to mess with bindings to enum in WPF, and I didn't like it big time.

You can work around this by mapping the properties to respective properties in the model, where in the get method you implement the dependency to the state of the enum.

For example:

<Button  Height="41" HorizontalAlignment="Center" Style="{StaticResource ButtonStyle}"
                    Margin="407,77,289,0" Name="buttonSearch" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="137" Click="search_click" 
                    IsEnabled="{Binding IsSearchButtonEnabled}" ...

Say you have this enum:

public enum States
{
    StateOne,
    StateTwo,
    StateThree
}

In the viewmodel then you can do this:

    public bool IsSearchButtonEnabled
    {
        get
        {
            return ((Model.actualState) == States.StateTwo);
        }
    }

To update automatically, your ViewModel must implement INotifyPropertyChanged. I use a general implementation that my ViewModels always subclass to simplify things. It looks like this and should handle updating the view everytime InvokePropertyChanged(string propertyName) is called. A ViewModel needs to know it should update the view, and it know when this method is called. You can use the same technique in your Model and place an event handler in your Model that notifies subscriber-VMs of the change in the setter of the state-enum.

public class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    public static event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChangedStatic;

    public void InvokePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    public static void InvokePropertyChangedStatic(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChangedStatic;
        if (handler != null) handler(null, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
} 
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You say "In the model then you can do this: public bool IsSearchButtonEnabled" Ideally the model knows nothing about UI or the view model. I would implement something in the viewmodel that represents the search enabled state (a boolean dependency property possibly) and then when the state changes in the model, have the massive switch statement that the OP alluded to. MUCH better, in my opinion is to store the state object in the view model and then use triggers when it changes from the xaml to set the button state. –  Jeremy White Oct 2 '12 at 10:48
    
Ah, so the model object needs to be set in the DataContext property of the view if this is what was missing for you. Also, the model needs to implement INotifyPropertyChanged. –  Akku Oct 2 '12 at 10:50
1  
Thirdly you could write a series of converters from the state to the thing you need. Like, write a converter called MyEnumStateToButtonEnabled that takes the enum type and returns a bool. –  Jeremy White Oct 2 '12 at 10:54
    
I really hate modifying the model to support anything UI related. Keep it all business logic, and implement a ViewModel that contains an element in it. If you really have to, you can implement INotifyPropertyChanged on the model, but keep all the UI stuff (targets for the view to bind to) in the view model and just react and update those targets when the model changes. –  Jeremy White Oct 2 '12 at 10:55
    
OK, maybe I got you wrong, I'll rephrase my answer in a second. –  Akku Oct 2 '12 at 10:56

In MVVM you really shouldn't be referencing anything in the View directly from the ViewModel.

The best solution is using commands, such as MVVM-Light RelayCommand, which has the CanExecute action based on the value of your enum property. You then bind the button's command property bind to the appropriate command property in the ViewModel. This will automatically set the enabled state of your button.

Then in the set method of your enum property, call the CanExecuteChanged event for each command.

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