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My understanding is that the way to go about registering a new user on the website/database, is to make a new entry in a user's table. Thereafter, whenever we want to retrieve specific user data from another data table, we have to query the user table to get our user ID (if it wasn't already in store of course), use that ID in a new query against our data table. If one would like a more modular design, we could create a new database for each new user although this is not as popular as the first method. I am not sure if my understanding is correct, so please correct me where you see fit.

The thing I'm pondering is that in PostgreSQL which happens to be my favorite player, you can use schemas. Schemas are like databases within a database. Then when you do your queries, you prefix thy table names with the schema name and put a dot in between. Much like if the schema was a class and you wanted access to a static property or so therein. I just love the notation!

..so why don't I have one database for my admin-related stuff, perhaps even a user table for the sake of it. But then I have another database only for user data, where each user has his own schema. Then all I need to store in my PHP:s user class is a variable that holds this schema name, and every time user specific data is to be retrieved from the database, this variable will be used.

What is the best practice for registering a new user, the do's and don'ts? Can you see any benefits or drawbacks with the schema design?

EDIT

Because this question has spoored some confusion as to what my end goal is, I'll clarify my problem here. In reality, the database design is a little bit more complex, but say I have three classes in my web app. One of them, hereon called Foo, is optionally in a has-a relationship with the other two, Bar1 and Bar2. A registered user to my site, can "create" any amount of Foo's, Bar1's and Bar2's independent of each other.

Foo is currently stored across several tables in the database. Here's his main table with an incrementing serial:

TABLE foo
(
  foo_id serial NOT NULL,
  title text
  CONSTRAINT foo_pk PRIMARY KEY (foo_id)
)

Let's not dig into the details of any other tables or how Bar's are stored. I've taken care to only have as few tables as possible, but still, I have to design the database with respect given to entity relationships and their constraints.

Foo could be dependent on the existence of any Bar1's and Bar2's. A Foo can have as many Bar1's and Bar2's as he wants too. So here's two tables to illustrate this ownership:

TABLE foo_has_bar1
(
  foo_id integer NOT NULL,
  bar1_id integer NOT NULL
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar1_pk PRIMARY KEY (foo_id, bar1_id),
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar1_fk1 FOREIGN KEY (foo_id) REFERENCES foo (foo_id),
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar1_fk2 FOREIGN KEY (bar1_id) REFERENCES bar1 (bar1_id)
)

TABLE foo_has_bar2
(
  foo_id integer NOT NULL,
  bar2_id integer NOT NULL
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar2_pk PRIMARY KEY (foo_id, bar2_id),
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar2_fk1 FOREIGN KEY (foo_id) REFERENCES foo (foo_id),
  CONSTRAINT foo_has_bar2_fk2 FOREIGN KEY (bar2_id) REFERENCES bar2 (bar2_id)
)

Currently, I don't have a column anywhere for the user_id of my registered users. I always thought I'd separate user data with schemas, and those schemas are of course stored together with a user_id in another database or in the public schema. Catcall said so too in a way in an answer in this thread, and I quote:

"Schemas are namespaces within a database in PostgreSQL."

[..]

"If each user has database objects that are devoted to that user, you can easily defend the decision to implement one schema per user [..]."

So I'm concerned with, what is the best practice? According to the feeling of all the answers in this thread, I shouldn't even consider using separate schemas. But then, wouldn't I have to have one more table for every type of object that ties together object_id with user_id [1]? It would currently be manageable, but I can still see how this will clutter my "namespace" instead of just having separate schemas.

[1] In PostgreSQL, I could break this down to just one table if each row represented a user and each successive column after the user_id was a column with an integer array identifying object relationships. But my experience with PostgreSQL's arrays (reading and modifying them in PHP) are bad bad bad, and also, I think processing them would be slower than multiple tables.

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Things would get interesting when a user registers with the username 'public' ;-) Seriously, using a schema for each user is a bad idea. –  leonbloy Oct 2 '12 at 11:12
    
@leonbloy, I understand that we would have to ban the use of "public" as a user name. Except that, are there any real disadvantages? Schemas in my view should be the perfect balance between a completely modular design using a new database for every user, and a completely user ID based design. Why I have this problem in the first place is because I store quite complicated objects in the database with their own ID:s. And some ID:s are related to other ID:s as they are components of each other so to speak. Mixing in the use of a user ID would complicate matters. –  Martin Andersson Oct 2 '12 at 11:53
1  
It looks like you are looking for the question "how do I best run a multi-tenant database with PostgreSQL" but you didn't know that the key term you needed was "multi-tenant". –  Craig Ringer Oct 2 '12 at 14:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My understanding is that the way to go about registering a new user on the website/database, is to make a new entry in a user's table. Thereafter, whenever we want to retrieve specific user data from another data table, we have to query the user table to get our user ID

Normally, you'd store the logged-in user's id in an application variable. Having done that, you don't need to query the database for it. For web apps, things like this are often stored in a session variable or a cookie. Take care that a user can't simply key in an arbitrary id number to access someone else's data.

If one would like a more modular design, we could create a new database for each new user although this is not as popular as the first method. I am not sure if my understanding is correct, so please correct me where you see fit.

"One database per user" is one end of a spectrum of approaches to multi-tenant (multi-customer) database design. For example, if you built online accounting software, you might reasonably choose to implement one database per tenant. This gives you the most data isolation, the simplest disaster recovery, and the most opportunity for customization.

"One database per user" is not a good choice for multi-user database design. StackOverflow is a multi-user system in this sense.

Schemas are like databases within a database.

Schemas are namespaces within a database in PostgreSQL. If you build online accounting software you might reasonably choose to implement one schema per tenant. You can grant permissions at the schema level, so you can easily isolate one user's data from all the others. Disaster recovery is fairly straightforward--just restore a single schema. You can put shared tables, views, and procedures in a separate schema that all users can read, too.

By design, PostgreSQL makes it relatively hard to query across databases. Querying across schemas is relatively easy.

"One schema per user" is not a good choice for multi-user database design. StackOverflow, for example, might end up with 4 million schemas if they did that.

..so why don't I have one database for my admin-related stuff, perhaps even a user table for the sake of it. But then I have another database only for user data, where each user has his own schema. Then all I need to store in my PHP:s user class is a variable that holds this schema name, and every time user specific data is to be retrieved from the database, this variable will be used.

If each user has database objects that are devoted to that user, you can easily defend the decision to implement one schema per user, and use a quasi-public schema for shared tables, views, procedures, etc. That's not the same as saying it's the best decision for your application.

"One schema per user" is another point on the spectrum of multi-tenant database design.

The far end of that spectrum is "Every user shares (almost) every table." Each row carries a user's identifier that shows which user owns each row. You have to take more care in coding to make sure you don't accidentally expose one user's data to a different user. Disaster recovery is troublesome.

SO has a multi-tenant tag. You might want to make that one of your favorites. I've added that tag to your question, since that seems to be the direction you're heading.

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than you so much for the answer. In one way I would like to consider this the answer, but still I'm not sure we're understanding each other, so I updated my question with an example. could you please have a quick look and see what you think? –  Martin Andersson Oct 4 '12 at 23:40
    
You need to determine whether your application requires a multi-user architecture or a multi-tenant architecture. It's beginning to sound like you need a multi-user architecture, but you think multiple schemas (perhaps one per user) will make that simpler. It probably won't. In a multi-user application, your application needs to know only the user's primary key (id number in this case). Information related to that user can be found in related tables; their names are the de facto public API for the database. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Oct 5 '12 at 0:51
    
The web app will server multiple users, who each can affect the application's outcome by "programming" his own set of rules. These rules are objects which has in storage references to other objects. It is the sum of all these sub objects that will make up the rule, affect the application's outcome. Anyways, I just assumed that having one schema per user would simplify things, and in a way, I think they do. It will certainly simplify my database design, but because everybody wants to tip me of I guess I'll have to forget all about it and become more table-oriented =) –  Martin Andersson Oct 5 '12 at 5:23
1  
Putting all the tables related to all the users into a single "users" schema, and putting all the tables related to rules into a single "rules" schema would be a more natural use of schemas. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Oct 5 '12 at 13:06
    
Yeah, that makes sense Catcall. –  Martin Andersson Oct 6 '12 at 1:34

I would advise against it.

You'll end up with many schema's, each for each user. If you ever want to query something over all these users, you'll have to jump through hoops.

Let me give you an example: Suppose you store for each user how many times (s)he logged in. And now you want to know how many times ALL users logged in.

I suggest you simply use 1 table per entity you want to store, and add an userid to it.

CREATE TABLE tbluserdata(
  userdataid SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
  userid integer REFERENCES tblusers(userid),
  nroflogins integer,
  mydata TEXT,
  whatever integer,
  etc. etc.
);

And use the userid in each query. Much cleaner in my opinion.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand the "jump through hoops" problem. But it isn't every day I'd have to do such a thing, if at all. And whenever I do want to join data across different users, why not jump through hoops? Isn't it much like doing a prepared query or adding stuff together in a for-loop? We as programmers do it every day in all other applications. Also, I could as easily store that particular information that need to be shared, in a "shared" table in the admin database I spoke of. The only real disadvantage I can see or understand is that we would have to ban the use of "public" as a user name. –  Martin Andersson Oct 2 '12 at 11:33
    
Martin, I understand it is possible. With the danger of sounding arrogant (which is NOT my intention): I think you should do it the way you proposed, if that is what you like. I expect you will find out you will make things much harder on yourself than needed, which is a valuable lesson. I have made loads of mistakes designing databases in the past, and it is simply a very good way to master the stuff: make mistakes. I have developed a lot of instincts when it comes to database design, and in this case my alarmbells ring. :-) But by all means: try it with multiple schemes. –  Erwin Moller Oct 2 '12 at 11:58
    
Erwin, you don't sound arrogant at all, fact is I think you sound cute and willing to help. I wholly respect your experience level, still, I'm not convinced using different schemas are a "harder way". I think it's the opposite. I updated my question with an example, please have a look and see what you think? –  Martin Andersson Oct 4 '12 at 23:43

I think you are confusing your web users and database users.

Common practice is to store users in a user(s) table. Spreading the data across several schemas will make it impossible to do effective queries with no real benefit.

CREATE TABLE users (
    id   serial PRIMARY KEY,
    name text NOT NULL
);

Do:

  • store encrypted password and salt
  • use primary keys to speed querys
  • validate data before you insert into db

Don´t:

  • store passwords in plain-text
  • trust user input
share|improve this answer
    
You wrote: "Spreading the data across several schemas will make it impossible to do effective queries with no real benefit". I can't see how? I think it's the other way around. In my webapp, I use objects that holds references to other objects. I have to fetch the component ID:s and put them into other queries to successfully build together complete objects. Mixing in the use of user ID would only complicate matters. The way I see it, schemas are a perfect balance between the standard way of doing it (user table and ID columns) and the more extreme to create a new database for every user. –  Martin Andersson Oct 2 '12 at 11:27
    
Try writing a query to fetch a user by email for example. What you are describing works well for document databases such as MongoDB, CouchDB or Jackrabbit, but is a poor fit for relational databases. –  papirtiger Oct 2 '12 at 11:32
    
Apprechiate your answers papirtiger. Still, if I wanted to run a query to get a user by his e-mail, I'd query the admin database I mentioned in my first post (the question). I intend to keep all "metadata" about the users in the admin database, neetly packed into just a few tables. There I will store their usernames, e-mails, and not the least the schema name used in the other database. This other database will only store user specific data needed by the core of the application. And as I said earlier, this user specific data are quite complicated stuff with their own interrelated IDs. –  Martin Andersson Oct 2 '12 at 11:46
1  
In PostgreSQL, using multiple schemas has virtually no effect on the ease or difficulty of writing effective queries. You might have to qualify a table name (refer to it as schema_name.table_name), but you usually don't even have to do that. There are real benefits to multiple schemas--for example, you can grant and revoke permissions on all tables in a schema using a single SQL statement. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Oct 5 '12 at 13:11
    
@Catcall, my god. You're amazing =) I agree with you (after reading extensively about this topic on the internet over the past few days). –  Martin Andersson Oct 6 '12 at 1:38

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