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I use the following to create objects in JavaScript using jQuery:

var article_attrs = { 
        'class' : 'class-name',
        click : function_name,
        hover : function_name,
        html : $('<h2>', { html : "Heading" })
    },
    article = $('<article>', atricle_attrs);

This works great - by setting the html attribute I set the content of the article.

What I want to do at this point though, is add a <h2> tag, and a <div> tag including a <footer> tag. My outline for this element will look like:

  • article
    • h2
    • div
      • footer

What would be the best way of doing this? (Note this is an example only).

Update: The main question is, using the html attribute, how do I add multiple elements?

I have tried a method from a similar question, but it does not work in this case:

html : [ $('<h2>', { html : "Heading" }), $('<div>', { html : "Some content" }) ]

I have made this fiddle which works.. but my JS still doesn't. I'm definitely missing something.

Edit: Works with jQuery 1.8.* only

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$("<element1>").add("<element2>") might do the trick. –  Shikyo Oct 2 '12 at 10:43
    
@Shikyo: add() adds another element to the jQuery selection, I think the question is 'how do I append am element to a newly-created jQuery object?' –  David Thomas Oct 2 '12 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

you could simply write like so

$('<h2></h2><div><footer></footer></div>').appendTo(article)
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I could, yes. However I like having control over all the attributes using object notation and would really like to find a method along the same lines. –  Alex Oct 2 '12 at 10:47
var $myEle = $("<article />").append(
                 $("<h2 />").text("...")
             ).append(
                 $("<div />").append(
                     $("<footer />")
                 )
             );

You can nest jQuery .append() method calls like above to create the HTML structure you need. I like this method because it makes it easy to visualize what the HTMl structure will be when you read it.

The above code would render this HTML:

<article>
    <h2>...</h2>
    <div>
        <footer></footer>
    </div>
</article>
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