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I am new to node.js and still trying to understand the philosophy behind it . As I learned , node.js runs in one process only as opposed to php which opens a process\thread for each request. And while you can say Node is 'non-blocking' for i/o , it is blocking for requests(the requests pile up since there is no new thread for each new request) and theoretically if you've written a node.js app that doesn't deal fast with each request you get in trouble.

My question is this - how can I tell if a certain handling of a request takes too long so that it will block all other requests for too long and hinder the performance of my app ?

I know that all the 'heavy' actions on the server (db querying , file system searching) are done by callbacks and therefore cannot block node. However what if all other operations that are done synchronously by the server to handle a request just take too long ?

For example- the server needs to write a lot of html to the response . What happens then ?

How can the node programmer know if he's doing too much with a certain request (in a blocking manner) , is it experience , intuition or are there clear guides on how to do it ?

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I'm fair new to Node.js also, but I think that you should use asynchronous callbacks for all operations. You shouldn't have any synchronous operation on your Node.js server. –  Bardo Oct 2 '12 at 10:49
    
Lets say your node.js writes an html file - long.html which has lots of lots of lines , the way you do it (as much as I understand) is by routing the request to some handler that will eventually have to perform something such as : response.write ("<html><head> ... so as far as I can see you can't really escape doing this at some point. At least as far as I know . –  Joel_Blum Oct 2 '12 at 10:56
    
What your handler has to do is to return that HTML to a callback whose work will be to post that html into the client, but out from your server code. –  Bardo Oct 2 '12 at 11:58

1 Answer 1

There are no clear guidelines as to where is the limit between synchronous code and asynchronous code, it is more of a matter with the application flow. Asynchronous operations should be preferred since they allow Node.js main process to start handling other requests in the meantime.

That said, simply using callbacks for every function is not a solution since a piece of code as such:

function sum(a, b, callback){
   var sum = a + b;
   callback(sum);
}

sum(2,3, function(sum){
   console.log(sum);
}

Is still synchronous. To make it asynchronous process.nextTick could be used as such:

function sum(a, b, callback){
   var sum = a + b;
   process.nextTick(function(){
     callback(sum);
   });
}

sum(2,3, function(sum){
   console.log(sum);
}

The general rule of thumb is to avoid synchronous recursive calculations, heavy loops and IO operations.

Finding out if a request takes too long and thus will hinder the performance can not be defined so generally as the limits are application specific. Those request are located by running performance tests on the application.

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+1 for "Those request are located by running performance tests on the application"--this is absolutely key. You can get a lot of performance insight using DTrace; check out the talk by Dave Pacheco called "Dtrace, Node.js and Flame Graphs," and the blog post Where does your Node program spend its time?. –  BinaryMuse Oct 2 '12 at 16:27
    
I'd accept this as the answer. To understand it more: howtonode.org/understanding-process-next-tick –  kakacii Aug 23 '13 at 15:38

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