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I am trying to convert char variables into Unsigned int. my code is

char spi(char data) 
{ 
    //Start transmision 
    SPDR = data; 
    //Wait for transmision complete 
    while(!(SPSR & 0x80)); 
    return SPDR; 
} 

unsigned int ReadAd(void) 
{ 
    unsigned int data; 

    ChipSelectAd(1); 
    //Read data 
    CheckStatus();                                            
    spi(0x58);                                                
    data = (spi(0xFF)<< 8);    
    data |= spi(0xFF);         

    return data; 
} 

Actually my problem is The spi function return an 8bit char so the above code shifts left 8bits the char variable and then assigns it to a 16bit variable, the result will always be 0. In order to actually shift the data to the left I need to typecast them first to a 16bit type variable. I have tried like this

char spi(char data) 
{ 
    //Start transmision 
    SPDR = data; 
    //Wait for transmision complete 
    while(!(SPSR & 0x80)); 
    return SPDR; 
} 

unsigned int ReadAd(void) 
{ 
    unsigned int data; 

    ChipSelectAd(1); 
    //Read data 
    CheckStatus();                                            
    spi(0x58);                                                
    data = (unsigned int)((unsigned char)spi(0xFF)<< 8);    
    data |= (unsigned int)((unsigned char)spi(0xFF));         

    return data; 
} 

void CheckStatus(void)
{
//char adcStatus;
adcStatus = 0xFF;                                           
//Read status
while(!(adcStatus & 0x80))
{
    spi(0x40);
    adcStatus = spi(0xFF);
 }
}

void ChipSelectAd(char s)
{


if(s == 1){
    PORTB.3 = 0;    //Switch on ADC
    //while(PINB.3);  //Wait for chip select pin
}
    else
        PORTB.3 = 1;    //Switch off ADC
 }

its not working. please suggest me which function i have to use.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Do you actually get any new data out of SPDR? How is SPDR defined? Is it something like *(char*)SOME_ADDRESS? If it is, is there a volatile in there, like this?: *(volatile char*)SOME_ADDRESS. The same holds for SPSR. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 11:35
    
@AlexeyFrunze Yes it must be defined as volatile. These are standard SPI hardware registers. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 11:41
    
@Lundin "must be defined" as in "they are defined" or as in "shall be defined"? –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 11:43
    
@AlexeyFrunze If you don't declare them as volatile, your compiler may go complete haywire and optimize all of the code, or do obscure optimizations. To make things worse, some MCUs clear the SPSR register by reading it, followed by a read to a data register. If the code doesn't do that, the flags will never be cleared and program will lock up, forever waiting for status flags. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 12:00
    
@Lundin I know what can happen if there's no volatile, which is why I brought up the subject. I merely asked if you know for sure they are already defined with volatile (e.g. in some "standard" include file or hard-coded in the compiler) or there's a chance they aren't defined in this way (e.g. the OP defined them incorrectly or inherited incorrect definitions from somewhere/someone else). –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 12:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your problem is not the casts. It works the same without them, due to the integral promotion rules.

#include <stdio.h>

char spi ( char data )
{
  char SPDR = data;
  return SPDR;
}

unsigned int ReadAd ( void )
{
  unsigned int data;

  data = spi ( 0x81 ) << 8;
  data |= spi ( 0x42 );

  return data;
}

int main ( void )
{
  printf ( "Result %x\n", ReadAd() );
  return 0;
}

This outputs Result ffff8142 on a system where char is a signed type. To get to the real problem, try assinging the values of spi() calls to variables and then print their values. Please also show us the declaration/definition of SPDR.

share|improve this answer
1  
To be picky, there is one problem with spi ( 0x81 ) << 8 though. char can be signed or unsigned, it is implementation-defined. Meaning that a 'char' type with MSB set will be treated as a signed and promoted to an int (signed). The code is then producing a signed int overflow, which is undefined behavior. Using left shift on signed ints is also undefined behavior. Just never ever use signed ints in anyform of bitwise operation and there will be no problems. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 11:57
    
@Lundin Just looked up C99. Surprised to the fact that negative value << count is unconditionally undefined (including the case where simple addition (to achieve the effect of shifting/multiplying by a non-negative power of 2) would not cause an overflow). Thanks. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 13:02
    
@AlexeyFrunze It is only undefined behavior if the result cannot be represended, ie if the sign bits are overwritten. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 13:20
1  
@Lundin Um. It says "If E1 has an unsigned type, the value... If E1 has a signed type and nonnegative value, and E1 * 2^E2 is representable in the result type, then that is the resulting value; otherwise, the behavior is undefined." With this wording, negative signed E1s fall under the "otherwise" clause with UB. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 13:25
    
@AlexeyFrunze Yes exactly. My point was, if you have a signed int E1 = 1; and then do E1 << 4, then 1*2^4 is representable in the result type (assuming two's complement), it is not undefined behavior. So the undefined behavior doesn't depend on the type, it depends on whether you cause an overflow or not when you shift. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 13:52

1) in embedded systems: get rid of the standard integer types, the default char type in particular. If you have a modern compiler, use uint8_t, uint16_t etc from stdint.h. If you have an ancient compiler, then typedef unsigned char uint8_t and so on. If you aren't using unsigned types of known size in embedded systems, you are asking for bugs bugs bugs.

2) Learn and understand integer promotion rules. It is frightening how many programmers there are that don't know about them or understand them.

Once you have the two above fundamentals sorted out, your code should look something like this code:

(I took the liberty to fix various suspicious, possible bugs and the crappy, inconsistent indention. Plus some style nitpicks.)

#include <stdint.h>

uint8_t spi (uint8_t data) 
{ 
  SPDR = data; //Start transmision 

  while((SPSR & 0x80) > 0) //Wait for transmision complete 
    ; 

  return SPDR; 
} 

uint16_t ReadAd(void) 
{ 
  uint16_t data; 

  ChipSelectAd(true); 

  CheckStatus(); //Read data 
  (void) spi(0x58);                                                

  data  = ((uint16_t)spi(0xFF)) << 8;
  data |=  (uint16_t)spi(0xFF);

  return data; 
} 

void CheckStatus(void)
{
  uint8_t adcStatus;

  do
  {
    (void) spi(0x40);
    adcStatus = spi(0xFF);
  } while((adcStatus & 0x80) > 0);
}

void ChipSelectAd(bool on)
{
  if(on)
  {
    PORTB.3 = 0;    //Switch on ADC
  }
  else
  {
    PORTB.3 = 1;    //Switch off ADC
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd still recommend to ditch the uint16_t casts. They are useless clutter. –  Jens Oct 2 '12 at 14:16
    
I'd also say that there is a perfectly reasonable use of the plain char type: when used for strings and string functions. Using pointers to plain char is the only way to avoid casting pointers for functions expecting plain char (because supplying a ptr-to-(un)-signed-char would require a diagnostic without a cast). –  Jens Oct 2 '12 at 14:24
    
@Jens i have tried in your way can you suggest me once what wrong with my code , i am new to controllers please suggest me. –  verendra Oct 2 '12 at 14:33
    
@Jens Regarding the cast: suppose you know that spi() always returns a large, positive value and have array[spi(0xFF) + negative], where negative is a plain int with a negative value. Since you didn't keep track of your types, that code will crash and burn. Because you'd have uint8 - int, then integer promotion, uint16 - int, then balancing uint16 - uint16. Array far out of bounds. If you had an explicit type cast there, then you would perhaps be more careful when writing that line. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 18:35
    
@Jens Regarding the char type: This is blatantly obviously raw binary transferred over SPI. The char type may have a purpose when used in strings, but I'd question that. Statements like ch - '0' are dangerous because you could end up with a signed result, that you then pass on to some bitwise operations and invoke undefined behavior. –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 18:45

The problem is that you performed a type casting to an unsigned char after performing the bit-shift operation, which cleared all the bits off the 1-byte scope, making it 0. Try this:

...

data = ((unsigned int)spi(0xFF))) << 8;
data |= (unsigned int)(spi(0xFF));

return data; 
share|improve this answer
2  
That's wrong. The << operator promotes its operands to int; there's no way you can shift only 8 bits and lose the tops bits as you describe. –  Jens Oct 2 '12 at 11:17
    
@Jens Thanks, I got myself a bit confused from the additional type casts. –  E_net4 Oct 2 '12 at 11:28

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