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I have an interface INetworkAware and need to declare method which will forece every class to register for events

currently using prisms eventaggregator our implementation is the following.

    protected override void SetupEvents()
    {
        RegisterForEvent<PatientSelected>(OnPatientSelected);
        base.SetupEvents();
    }

SetupEvents method is declared as virtual in ViewModelbase class. in out situation we want to have above mentioned INetworkAware interface and in addition to deriving from ViewModelBase if any class is interested in listening to network changes(network offline/online) and implement INetworkAware interface we want to have mechanism to force them to register for this event using same principals. so for example if we create class

public class PatientInformationViewModel : ViewModelBase, INetworkAware
{
     protected override void SetupEvents()
     {
         RegisterForEvent<PatientSelected>(OnPatientSelected);
         base.SetupEvents();
     }

     INetworkAware.ListenForNetworkChange
     {
         RegisterForEvent<NetworkChangeEvent>(OnNetworkChange)
     }

     OnNetworkChange(NetworkChangeEvent networkstatus)
     {

     }
 }

NetworkChangeEvent is a sample POCO class

INetworkAware.ListenForNetworkChange and OnNetworkChange(NetworkChangeEvent networkstatus) must be implemented in every viewmodel deriving from INetworkaware and with the same signature.

houw can we accomplish this scenario

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are almost on the right track. If you implement the interface on the base class and then declare your method as abstract in the base class that will force any extending (deriving) class to implement it's own version:

public abstract class ViewModelBase : INetworkAware
{

    public abstract void SetupEvents();

}

public class PatientInformationViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public override void SetupEvents()
    {
        //register for your events
    }
}

Alternatively you can declare the method in the base class as virtual rather than abstract and provide a base implementation, and your derived classes can simply override this when necessary. I've used this pattern before myself and it is quite effective - just make sure you include an Unsubscribe() (or similar) on the interface as well.

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I have already done this but not all derived classes listen for network changes. that's why I declare interface and despite this fact, that all ViewModels derive from ViewModelbase (which has RegisterForEvent method I need to separate network event registration from other events and this is hard part of this implementation for me –  Rati_Ge Oct 2 '12 at 11:11
    
@Rati_Ge Then just use the empty virtual implementation in the ViewModelBase, and simply override it when necessary. An empty implementation means you can safely invoke the method but nothing gets done. Derived classes that don't listen for events don't need to do anything at all, the empty implementation in the base class covers it. –  slugster Oct 2 '12 at 11:17
    
so u suggest not to use separate interface for this? I thought this would be cleaner way as I could cast all instances as interface and invoke that method only for those whichimplement INetworkAware –  Rati_Ge Oct 2 '12 at 11:39
    
@Rati_Ge You can use any interface you need, for example when I did this my interface was called ISubscribeEvents. Regardless of the interface name, you can cast all view models that derive from ViewModelBase to that interface type and call the method ((INetworkAware) myPatientInformationViewModel).SetupEvents(). If any particular view model doesn't need to do anything then simply don't override the SetupEvents() method, which means the one in the base view model will get called (and the base one does nothing). –  slugster Oct 2 '12 at 12:03

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