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I'm writing Win32 console application, which can be started with optional arguments like this:

app.exe /argName1:"argValue" /argName2:"argValue"

Do I have to parse it manually (to be able to determine, which arguments are present) from argc/argv variables, or does Win32 API contain some arguments parser?

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See the documentation of WinMain, the command line parameters come as a single string and not as argv/argc (though you can get it in that format through another function). –  Lundin Oct 2 '12 at 11:23

6 Answers 6

The only support that Win32 provides for command line arguments are the functions GetCommandLine and CommandLineToArgvW. This is exactly the same as the argv parameter that you have for a console application.

You will have to do the parsing yourself. Regex would be a good option for this.

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You could mess around with various libraries and stuff... But sometimes all you require is something simple, practical and quick:

int i;
char *key, *value;

for( i = 1; i <= argc; i++ ) {
    if( *argv[i] == '/' ) {
        key = argv[i] + 1;
        value = strchr(key, ':');
        if( value != NULL ) *value++ = 0;
        process_option( key, value );
    } else {
        process_value( argv[i] );
    }
}

You get the idea...

This is assuming a normal Win32 console app as you have implied (which has a traditional main function). For Win32 apps you come in at WinMain instead, as another person has already commented.

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I don't believe that there is a Win32 API available. You can look for a Windows implementation of getopt or another library.

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Not sure about existence of such a win32 api function(s), but Boost.Program_Options library could help you.

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Just for the record, if you use MinGW's GCC, rather than Microsoft's MSVC, you get GNU getopt, (which also includes getopt_long and getopt_long_only variants), included within the standard runtime library.

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