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Assignment of objects and fundamental types

a = [1,2,3]
b = a
print b is a

This code prints True. Why? "is" only returns True if the two variables point to the same object, when in this case they're different objects with the same value. "==" would return True, but "is" shouldn't.

However, since

b.reverse()
print a,b

prints [3, 2, 1] [3, 2, 1], it seems that as far as the interpreter is concerned, they ARE the same object, and operations on b will automatically be performed on a. Again, why? I've never seen anything like this happen before.

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marked as duplicate by phant0m, iMat, H.Muster, hakre, hochl Oct 4 '12 at 13:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
"when in this case they're different objects with the same value" I think not. –  Waleed Khan Oct 2 '12 at 11:20
    
It's time for you to study Python better. a is a reference to list [1,2,3], and b=a assigns the reference contained in a to b, so now they contain references to the same list. –  Anton Guryanov Oct 2 '12 at 11:25

6 Answers 6

a = [81, 82, 83]
b = a
print(a is b) #prints True

this is what actually happens here:

enter image description here

and for something like :

a = [81,82,83]
b = [81,82,83]

print(a is b) # False

print(a == b)  #True, as == only checks value equality

enter image description here

In [24]: import sys

In [25]: a=[1,2,3]

In [26]: sys.getrefcount(a) #number of references to [1,2,3] are 2
Out[26]: 2

In [27]: b=a       #now b also points to [1,2,3]

In [28]: sys.getrefcount(a)   # reference to [1,2,3] got increased by 1,
                              # as b now also points to [1,2,3]
Out[28]: 3

In [29]: id(a)
Out[29]: 158656524      #both have the same id(), that's why "b is a" is True

In [30]: id(b)
Out[30]: 158656524

When to use the copy module:

In [1]: a=[1,2,3]

In [2]: b=a

In [3]: id(a),id(b)        
Out[3]: (143186380, 143186380)   #both point to the same object

In [4]: b=a[:]                #now use slicing, it is equivalent to b=copy.copy(a)
                              # or b= list(a)    

In [5]: id(a),id(b)
Out[5]: (143186380, 143185260)     #as expected both now point to different objects
                                   # so now changing one will not affect other

In [6]: a=[[1,2],[3,4]]          #list of lists

In [7]: b=a[:]                   #use slicing

In [8]: id(a),id(b)            #now both point to different object as expected
                               # But what about the internal lists?
Out[8]: (143184492, 143186380)

In [11]: [(id(x),id(y)) for (x,y) in zip(a,b)]   #so internal list are still same objects
                                                 #so doing a[0][3]=5, will changes b[0] too
Out[11]: [(143185036, 143185036), (143167244, 143167244)]

In [12]: from copy import deepcopy            #to fix that use deepcopy

In [13]: b=deepcopy(a)

In [14]: [(id(x),id(y)) for (x,y) in zip(a,b)]    #now internal lists are different too
Out[14]: [(143185036, 143167052), (143167244, 143166924)]

for more details:

In [32]: def func():
   ....:     a=[1,2,3]
   ....:     b=a
   ....:     
   ....:     

In [34]: import dis

In [35]: dis.dis(func)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (1)
              3 LOAD_CONST               2 (2)
              6 LOAD_CONST               3 (3)
              9 BUILD_LIST               3
             12 STORE_FAST               0 (a)   #now 'a' poits to [1,2,3]

  3          15 LOAD_FAST                0 (a)    #load the object referenced by a
             18 STORE_FAST               1 (b)    #store the object returned by a to b 
             21 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             24 RETURN_VALUE        

In [36]: def func1():
   ....:     a=[1,2,3]
   ....:     b=[1,2,3]
   ....:     
   ....:     

In [37]: dis.dis(func1)      #here both a and b are loaded separately
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (1)
              3 LOAD_CONST               2 (2)
              6 LOAD_CONST               3 (3)
              9 BUILD_LIST               3
             12 STORE_FAST               0 (a)

  3          15 LOAD_CONST               1 (1)
             18 LOAD_CONST               2 (2)
             21 LOAD_CONST               3 (3)
             24 BUILD_LIST               3
             27 STORE_FAST               1 (b)
             30 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             33 RETURN_VALUE   
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick responses. I tried a = [1,2,3] b = [1,2,3] and that fixed it, but that won't work for the code I'm trying to write. How do I let the interpreter know that I want it to consider a and b different objects, so that b.reverse() doesn't change a? –  Jeff Konecki Oct 2 '12 at 11:25
2  
@JeffKonecki b=a[:] (shallow copy) –  Andy Hayden Oct 2 '12 at 11:30
1  
Try out the copy class: docs.python.org/library/copy.html –  Dan Oct 2 '12 at 11:32
2  
@JeffKonecki b=a[:] will do it for simple lists, but in case of list of lists you need deepcopy() from copy module. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 2 '12 at 11:39
1  
What do you need the copy for? What are you really trying to do, and why aren't you asking that question instead? –  Karl Knechtel Oct 2 '12 at 12:18

When you do a = [1, 2, 3] you're binding the name a to a list object. When you do b = a, you're binding the name b to whatever a is - in this case the list object. Ergo, they're the same... An object can have multiple names. It's worth reading up on the Python Data Model.

If you wanted to make a copy of your listobj, then you can look at b = a[:] to use slice to create a shallow copy, or copy.copy for a shallow copy (should work on arbitary objects), or copy.deepcopy for strangely - a deep copy.

You'll also notice something surprising in CPython which caches short strings/small integers...

>>> a = 4534534
>>> b = a
>>> a is b
True
>>> b = 4534534
>>> a is b
False
>>> a = 1
>>> b = a
>>> a is b
True
>>> b = 1
>>> a is b
True
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Can you explain why the last case is true? It seems inconsistent so why is it designed that way? seems to me to work only for integers btw (inlcuding) -5 to 256, which is an odd interval. –  Dan Oct 2 '12 at 12:23
1  
@dan It also works for single characters (partly why the 256). Since strings and ints are immutable, then it makes sense to only keep one copy of commonly used values hanging around... -5 is probably to handle a few common error codes, 0 and 1 are used quite often, and for short loops or bitwise ops, 0..256 makes sense... –  Jon Clements Oct 2 '12 at 12:29

They are actually referencing the same object.

Try this:

a = [1,2,3]
b = a
print b is a
b[0] = 0
print b is a

You will see that both a and b were changed and are still the same as each other.

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I'm not sure if lists work the same but have a look at this from a numpy.array() tutorial regarding shallow and deep copies: http://www.scipy.org/Tentative_NumPy_Tutorial#head-1529ae93dd5d431ffe3a1001a4ab1a394e70a5f2

a = b simply creates a new reference to the same object. To get a real copy you'll probably find the the list object has something similar to the deep copy example in the link so b = a.copy(). Then you could say there are 2 references to two separate objects with the same values.

Also I think most OO languages work like this in that = just creates a new reference and not a new object.

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a = [1,2,3]
b = a
print b is a

You are comparing references to the same list. If you do the following:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]
print b is a

you should get a False.

share|improve this answer

This code prints True. Why?

Because b is a.

"is" only returns True if the two variables point to the same object

If they name the same object. "Point to" is vulgar terminology that alludes to a much lower level model of programming.

when in this case they're different objects with the same value.

No, they aren't.

In Python, b = a means "b shall cease to be a name for whatever it currently names, if anything, and become a name for whatever a currently names". The same object. Not a copy.

Things do not get copied implicitly in Python.

prints [3, 2, 1] [3, 2, 1], it seems that as far as the interpreter is concerned, they ARE the same object

Because they are.

and operations on b will automatically be performed on a.

Because they are the same object.

Again, why?

Again, because they are.

...It is as though you thought of every obvious test confirming the behaviour, but refuse to reject your core assumption once every test contradicts it, even though there is nothing in the literature supporting your core assumption (because in fact it is false).

I've never seen anything like this happen before.

Then you must never have tested anything like this before in Python, because it has always worked this way in Python. It's not even that strange among programming languages; Java does the same thing for everything that's not of a primitive type, and C# does the same thing for classes (reference types) while doing what you apparently expect for structs (value types). It's called "reference semantics" and it's by no means a new idea.

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