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Suppose I have test.sh as below. The intent is to run some background task(s) by this script, that continuously updates some file. If the background task is terminated for some reason, it should be started again.

#!/bin/sh

if [ -f pidfile ] && kill -0 $(cat pidfile); then
    cat somewhere
    exit
fi

while true; do
    echo "something" >> somewhere
    sleep 1
done &
echo $! > pidfile

and want to call it like ./test.sh | otherprogram, e. g. ./test.sh | cat.

The pipe is not being closed as the background process still exists and might produce some output. How can I tell the pipe to close at the end of test.sh? Is there a better way than checking for existence of pidfile before calling the pipe command?

As a variant I tried using #!/bin/bash and disown at the end of test.sh, but it is still waiting for the pipe to be closed.


What I actually try to achieve: I have a "status" script which collects the output of various scripts (uptime, free, date, get-xy-from-dbus, etc.), similar to this test.sh here. The output of the script is passed to my window manager, which displays it. It's also used in my GNU screen bottom line.

Since some of the scripts that are used might take some time to create output, I want to detach them from output collection. So I put them in a while true; do script; sleep 1; done loop, which is started if it is not running yet.

The problem here is now that I don't know how to tell the calling script to "really" detach the daemon process.

share|improve this question
    
Can you let us know, what is the TERMINATING condition for the script? I mean, when the 'waiting' process is expected to end? –  anishsane Oct 25 '12 at 13:41
    
The script should terminate after the end is reached. It terminates correctly if its output is not piped, i. e. just calling ./test.sh. –  exic Oct 25 '12 at 13:51
    
I think I understood your question. I will try to find answer. –  anishsane Oct 25 '12 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

See if this serves your purpose: (I am assuming that you are not interested in any stderr of commands in while loop. You would adjust the code, if you are. :-) )

#!/bin/bash

if [ -f pidfile ] && kill -0 $(cat pidfile); then
    cat somewhere
    exit
fi

while true; do
    echo "something" >> somewhere
    sleep 1
done >/dev/null 2>&1 &
echo $! > pidfile
share|improve this answer
    
That does it! >/dev/null is the solving part. The subshell (braces around while) is not needed, but & then has to be placed after 2>&1. Then the last line also works (which it does not with this code, since the outer shell does not know the PID of the background process). –  exic Oct 25 '12 at 14:30
    
Oh, sorry... I had forgotten about $! on the last line... –  anishsane Oct 25 '12 at 14:32
    
I've edited it (awaiting peer review), in case someone else comes across this. I can award you the bounty in one hour. Thanks! –  exic Oct 25 '12 at 14:45
    
You are welcome :-) –  anishsane Oct 25 '12 at 15:08

If you want to explicitly close a file descriptor, like for example 1 which is standard output, you can do it with:

exec 1<&-

This is valid for POSIX shells, see: here

share|improve this answer
    
It is ment to run all the time and be started if it is not running, so killing the subprocess or waiting unfortunately won't help. –  exic Oct 2 '12 at 12:51
    
Ok. Sorry for not understanding you're question. I don't think I fully understood it yet, but I think I'm starting to. I edited it into another answer. I'm not 100% sure this is what you want, but hopefully it helps =) –  Janito Vaqueiro Ferreira Filho Oct 2 '12 at 13:18
    
Thank you for giving the hint with exec. However, I can't seem to get it to work. I tried putting exec 1<&- at the end of the script, which as far as I understood it should have closed the stdout fd. But still, running the script as ./test.sh | cat, it does not return. Adding exec 2<&- to close stderr as well didn't do it either. –  exic Oct 4 '12 at 16:51

When you put the while loop in an explicit subshell and run the subshell in the background it will give the desired behaviour.

(while true; do
    echo "something" >> somewhere
    sleep 1
done)&
share|improve this answer
    
please explain. You're talking bash? Good luck to all. –  shellter Oct 2 '12 at 11:36
1  
Sorry, running it like ./test.sh | cat still does not return but wait forever. –  exic Oct 2 '12 at 11:44
    
You are correct, I got my tests mixed up. –  Tim Lamballais Oct 2 '12 at 11:48

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