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In Unity csharp, I want to make a GetOrAddComponent method, which will simplify the respectives GetComponent and AddComponent (for no good reason I suppose).

The usual way is this:

// this is just for illustrating a context
using UnityEngine;
class whatever : MonoBehavior {
public Transform child;
void whateverMethod () {

    BoxCollider boxCollider = child.GetComponent<BoxCollider>();
    if (boxCollider == null) {
        boxCollider = child.gameObject.AddComponent<BoxCollider>();
    }

}}

Right now I could make this class . . . :

public class MyMonoBehaviour : MonoBehaviour {

    static public Component GetOrAddComponent (Transform child, System.Type type) {
        Component result = child.GetComponent(type);
        if (result == null) {
            result = child.gameObject.AddComponent(type);
        }
        return result;
    }

}

. . . So this works:

// class whatever : MyMonoBehavior {

BoxCollider boxCollider = GetOrAddComponent(child, typeof(BoxCollider)) as BoxCollider;

But I wish I could write it like this:

BoxCollider boxCollider = child.GetOrAddComponent<BoxCollider>();

The only idea I could come up with would be way too complicated to do it (replacing each Transform with a MyTransform) and thus not worth the trouble of even trying. At least not just for a nicer syntax.

But is it? Or is there any other way this could be achieved?

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There, this is my final result, thanks to Botz3000: wiki.unity3d.com/index.php/GetOrAddComponent –  Cawas Dec 10 '12 at 21:49
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Have you tried using Extension Methods? You can declare them like this:

public static class MyMonoExtensions {

    public static T GetOrAddComponent<T>(this Transform child) where T: Component {
        T result = child.GetComponent<T>();
        if (result == null) {
            result = child.gameObject.AddComponent<T>();
        }
        return result;
    }

}

You can call it like an instance method, then:

child.GetOrAddComponent<BoxCollider>();

See the link above for more details on extension methods.

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Just to say that these only look like part of the extended type (IDE magic) - they are completely separate. –  Oded Oct 2 '12 at 12:34
1  
@Oded: but that's probably what OP wanted anyway. If there were no extension methods, a static method like this would be perfectly suitable, although much less discoverable through IDE. –  Lousy Coder Oct 2 '12 at 12:56
1  
@Dilbert - True and I didn't say it wasn't. I just wanted to note that an extension method is syntactic sugar. –  Oded Oct 2 '12 at 13:19
    
I have indeed not thought of using Extension Methods, even though I've stumbled upon it before! :P –  Cawas Oct 2 '12 at 16:25
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You can use extension methods since c# 3.0

public static MonoBehaviourExtension
{
     public static void GetOrAdd(this MonoBehaviour thisInstance, <args>)
     {
           //put logic here
     }
}
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Just to say that these only look like part of the extended type (IDE magic) - they are completely separate. –  Oded Oct 2 '12 at 12:31
    
@Oded As far as i understand, the extension method is compiled just like a 'regular' method, that is, the first argument it's the instance itself. From the IDE point of view, yes it is a kind of magic, but it reflects what will be done from the runtime perspective –  Luis Filipe Oct 2 '12 at 12:55
    
An extension method compiles to a separate type from what it "extends". It is a static method and the IDE makes it look as if it belongs to the extended type. –  Oded Oct 2 '12 at 13:22
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You can use Extension methods.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static T GetOrAddComponent<T>(this Transform child) where T : Component 
    {
            T result = child.GetComponent<T>();
            if (result == null) {
                result = child.gameObject.AddComponent<T>();
            }
            return result;
    }
}

Now you can use BoxCollider boxCollider = child.GetOrAddComponent<BoxCollider>();

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