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Im trying to add a border on a PNG image I have (Example included). The thing is that when I add the border currently it adds it on a box shape around all the image and not on the exact vector (Meaning it includes the transparent parts in the image).

Is there any possible way to setup the configuration of the border that it won't consider the transparent area's. (Even if not in CSS... Maybe HTML5/JS?)

Example image

enter image description here

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Even though the image is a transparent png, the border is applied to the element, which is still essentially a square around the image. There isn't a solution sadly, why can't you make the border on the actul image? – Andy Oct 2 '12 at 12:43
    
Can you illustrate what you want the image + border to look like? – Jon Egerton Oct 2 '12 at 12:43
    
Hi Jon, I added the image of an example how I'd like it to show. – nimi Oct 2 '12 at 12:47
    
You could try playing with Raphael. raphaeljs.com. Or loading your image into a HTML5 canvas and doing your border with an edge-detection script (eek!). – Lee Kowalkowski Oct 2 '12 at 13:49
    
There you are then - you've got a nice green border! ;-). Seriously though - you're not going to achieve this without drawing the border on the image yourself. – Jon Egerton Oct 2 '12 at 13:50

As of now (January 31st 2015) there is a way to do that without using canvas, with pure CSS, and with only 2 lines of code.

The trick is using the css filter and -webkit-filter properties to draw two drop shadows with no blur, one for the positive axis and one for the negative, which will wrap around the image, which will provide the (hopefully) desired effect.

Note: css filters are not at all supported in IE (let's hope Spartan does better), here is a compatibility table.

This first snippet (fiddle) will apply the simplest border possible.

img {
  -webkit-filter: drop-shadow(1px 1px 0 black)
                  drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 black);
  filter: drop-shadow(1px 1px 0 black) 
          drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 black);
}

body {
  background-color: lightcoral;
}
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/GZoXRjS.png" width="250">

As you can see, some images (like this awesome baymax render) need a little more tweaking, you can see the right border is a little smaller than the left.

With that in mind, here is the perfected border snippet (fiddle) with just a really tiny value tweak.

img {
  -webkit-filter: drop-shadow(2px 1px 0 black)
                  drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 black);
  filter: drop-shadow(2px 1px 0 black) 
          drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 black);
}

body {
  background-color: khaki;
}
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/GZoXRjS.png" width="250">

That should cover borders pretty well, but we can still have more fun with this, look at this awesome lightness effect snippet (fiddle).

img{
    -webkit-filter: drop-shadow(1px 1px 0 black) 
                    drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 white);
    filter:drop-shadow(1px 1px 0 black) 
           drop-shadow(-1px -1px 0 white);
}

body{
    background-color:lightblue;
}
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/GZoXRjS.png" width="250">

Hope this helps anyone wondering about the possibility of a wrap-around border for semitransparent images!

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1  
Let's hope this solution makes it into the specs and that IE starts supporting it! +1 – web-tiki Feb 1 '15 at 13:59
1  
good idea, just a tip, the effect works out a bit better using 4 drop shadows if your going for a bigger stroke: filter: drop-shadow(2px 0px 0 black) drop-shadow(0px 2px 0 black) drop-shadow(-2px -0px 0 black) drop-shadow(-0px -2px 0 black); – Adam Coulombe Mar 22 at 13:55

Came across needing to do this myself - came up with this hack. A series of overlaid images behind my original that were slightly out of step with each other. Context ctx3 is a copy of the original image and this would replicate a white silhouette behind the original several times.

      ctx3.shadowColor = "rgba(255,255,255,1)";
      ctx3.globalCompositeOperation = 'source-over';
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = 2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = 2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = -2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = -2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = -2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = 2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = 2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = -2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = 0;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = 2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = 0;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = -2;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = 2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = 0;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
      ctx3.shadowOffsetX = -2;
      ctx3.shadowOffsetY = 0;
      ctx3.shadowBlur = 0;
      ctx3.drawImage(YourImageSource,0,0);
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