Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The following code fails to compile with Intel C++ 2013.

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>


template <
    typename T, 
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type
>
void myfunc( T a) 
{ 
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

template <
    typename T, 
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<T>::value>::type
>
void myfunc( T a) 
{ 
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}




int main()
{
    double a;
    int b;
    myfunc(a);
    myfunc(b);

    return 0;

}

Here is the error output:

ConsoleApplication1.cpp(33): error : no instance of overloaded function "myfunc" matches the argument list
1>              argument types are: (double)
1>      myfunc(a);
1>      ^
1>  
1>ConsoleApplication1.cpp(34): error : no instance of overloaded function "myfunc" matches the argument list
1>              argument types are: (int)
1>      myfunc(b);
1>      ^
1>  

Where am I going wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
std::cout << T? Do you mean a? –  kennytm Oct 2 '12 at 12:55
    
Yes, thanks. Corrected. –  Josh Greifer Oct 2 '12 at 12:59
    
you cannot have a template nontype parameter of type void. tell enable_if to give you a type int and ptovide a default value –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 3 '12 at 9:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The usual and correct way to use enable_if in a function is to stick it in the return type.

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type myfunc(T a) {
    std::cout << a << " (integral)" << std::endl;
}

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<T>::value>::type myfunc(T a) {
    std::cout << a << " (non-integral)" << std::endl;
}

For your variant, the correct way is:

template <typename T,
          typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type>
void myfunc(T a) {
    std::cout << a << " (integral)" << std::endl;
}

... the "enable_if" is a default template argument. And it does not work in your case because that function is not overloaded.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I do know it's more frequently used, but the variation I've used (or at least a correct version of it!) is also acceptable, and I want to use void functions in this case. –  Josh Greifer Oct 2 '12 at 13:07
    
@JoshGreifer The omitted second argument of enable_if defaults to void. The myfuncs in this answer don't need to return any value, the return type is void. –  hvd Oct 2 '12 at 13:09
    
Ok I think I understand -- so if I wanted the myfuncs to return int, I could use std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<T>::value, int>::type ? –  Josh Greifer Oct 2 '12 at 13:13
    
@JoshGreifer: (Comment #1) See update; (Comment #3) Yes. –  kennytm Oct 2 '12 at 13:14
    
Thanks -- much clearer now –  Josh Greifer Oct 2 '12 at 13:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.