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I'm trying to add nested types in a custom Ant tag as explained in http://ant.apache.org/manual/develop.html#nested-elements but I keep getting the exception outer doesn't support the nested "innerone" element.

I've spent all morning googling but I can't find any examples, tutorials or any help using this pattern that addressing this issue and I'm starting to wonder if it's even implemented!

My build file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project name="test" default="tester" basedir="../../..">
  <taskdef name="outer" classname="tester.Outer" classpath="target/classes"/>
  <typedef name="innerone" classname="tester.Outer$InnerOne" classpath="target/classes"/>
  <typedef name="innertwo" classname="tester.Outer$InnerTwo" classpath="target/classes"/>

  <target name="tester">
    <innerone/>
    <innertwo/>
    <outer>
      <innerone/>
      <innertwo/>
    </outer>
  </target>
</project>

Java code:

public class Outer extends Task
{
  private List<Inner> inners = new ArrayList<Inner>();
  public void add(Inner inner) {
    inners.add(inner);
    System.out.println("Add: ");
  }
  public void addConfigured(Inner inner) {
    inners.add(inner);
    System.out.println("AddConfigured: ");
  }
  public void execute() {
    for (Inner inner : inners) {
      System.out.println("Inner: " + inner.getMsg());
    }
  }

  public interface Inner {
    String getMsg();
  }
  public static class InnerOne implements Inner {
    public String getMsg() {
      return "One";
    }
  }
  public static class InnerTwo implements Inner {
    public String getMsg() {
      return "Two";
    }
  }
}

Using the methods addInner(Inner inner) and addConfiguredInner(Inner inner) both work, but I would like to be able to add inner tags that implement Inner interface without having to explicitly create methods for them in the Outer class.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example is so similar to the one you linked, from ant manual. What's the difference between them, so that one works, while the other one not? It was quite a long way, but making them more and more similar, step by step, I discovered the distinction.

In typedef there must be loaderRef attribute given, equal to classpath. The documentation of typedef task says:

Use this to allow multiple tasks/types to be loaded with the same loader, so they can call each other.

Probably using antlib would make this problem non-existent, as it is then declared in one ant script line.

Finally the answer is: yes, they do work :)

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Thank you so much~ loaderRef was the key! –  KidTempo Oct 3 '12 at 11:42

Traditionally, nested element names had to be specified in the method name, such as defining nested element <inner> as either addInner(Inner inner) or addConfiguredInner(Inner inner) (which, as you mentioned, works).

Ant 1.5 introduced the DynamicConfigurator interface, which provides a mechanism to dynamically define attribute and nested element names. Although this does not exactly provide the functionality that you are looking for, you may still find it useful. For example, your Outer task could be implemented as follows.

import org.apache.tools.ant.BuildException;
import org.apache.tools.ant.DynamicConfigurator;
import org.apache.tools.ant.Task;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Outer extends Task implements DynamicConfigurator
{
  private List<Inner> inners = new ArrayList<Inner>();

  public void setDynamicAttribute(String name, String value)
      throws BuildException {
    throw new BuildException("Attribute " + name + " is not supported");
  }

  public Inner createDynamicElement(String elementName) {
    Inner newInner = null;
    if (elementName.equalsIgnoreCase("innerone")) {
      newInner = new InnerOne();
    } else if (elementName.equalsIgnoreCase("innertwo")) {
      newInner = new InnerTwo();
    } else {
      throw new BuildException("Unsupported nested element: " + elementName);
    }
    inners.add(newInner);
    return newInner;
  }

  public void execute() {
    for (Inner inner : inners) {
      System.out.println("Inner: " + inner.getMsg());
    }
  }

  public interface Inner {
    String getMsg();
  }

  public static class InnerOne implements Inner {
    public String getMsg() {
      return "One";
    }
  }

  public static class InnerTwo implements Inner {
    public String getMsg() {
      return "Two";
    }
  }
}

Build File (excerpt)

<taskdef name="outer" classname="tester.Outer" classpath="target/classes"/>

<target name="outer-test">
  <outer>
    <innerone />
    <innertwo />
  </outer>
</target>

Output

outer-test:
    [outer] Inner: One
    [outer] Inner: Two

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 0 seconds
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