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This is the definition of extend in Pro Javascript Design Patterns, Apress, 2008, p.44:

function extend(subClass, superClass) {
  var F = function() {};
  F.prototype = superClass.prototype;
  subClass.prototype = new F();
  subClass.prototype.constructor = subClass;

  subClass.superclass = superClass.prototype;
  if(superClass.prototype.constructor == Object.prototype.constructor) {
    superClass.prototype.constructor = superClass;
  }
}

For the line subClass.superclass = superClass.prototype;, I think it probably is equally the same if we do subClass.superclass = superClass, since in the future, we can always get to the prototype by subClass.superclass.prototype anyway. But I thought why not point to the constructor function, but point to the prototype? But this is a minor question.

The more important questions is, why do the last lines try to set the Object's prototype's constructor back to self? I tried it in Firefox and Chrome, and they always point that way already.

Also a little strange is that, why does it use if(superClass.prototype.constructor == Object.prototype.constructor) ? Why not just use if (superClass === Object) instead?

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The constructor property is what makes instanceof work. It's a fine detail that honestly doesn't often matter. –  Matt Greer Oct 2 '12 at 13:30
    
@MattGreer: Wrong. The constructor property has no functional purpose in EcmaScript. –  Bergi Oct 2 '12 at 13:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

subClass.superclass = superClass.prototype; Why not point to the constructor function, but point to the prototype?

Both could be done, and it's just a design issue. I guess that superClass property is mostly needed in overwritten methods that want to call their super method, and they can do so by calling this.constructor.superClass[methodName]. But yes, it is a bit weird that you need the constructor property for this, a direct property on the prototype would have been easier again.

The more important questions is, why do the last lines try to set the Object's prototype's constructor back to self?

It seems that is done for compatibility with poor prototype declarations. If someone uses

MyClass.prototype = {…};

and does not reset the constructor, then in extend(MySubClass, MyClass) the superClass.prototype.constructor will be Object, and the common applying of the superclass constructor

this.constructor.superClass.constructor.apply(this, args);
// for those who don't want to use MyClass.apply

in the MySubClass constructor would fail. So the extend function corrects this.

Also a little strange is that, why does it use if(superClass.prototype.constructor == Object.prototype.constructor)? Why not just use if (superClass === Object) instead?

It should be clear now why we want superClass.prototype.constructor. But yes, we could have used Object instead of Object.prototype.constructor.

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