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I'm trying to set up VBO for my rendering code to get more fps. It worked for separate VBO's for vertex position, color and texture coords but after transferring to interleaved vertex data there is no geometry rendering. Here is my setup func:

const GLsizeiptr data_size = NUMBER_OF_CUBE_VERTICES * 9 *sizeof(float);
// allocate a new buffer
glGenBuffers(1, &cubeVBO);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeVBO);
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, data_size, data, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

float* ptr = (float*)data;
glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_VERTEX, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(struct Vertex), (ptr + 0));
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_VERTEX);

glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_COLOR, 4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(struct Vertex), (ptr + 3));
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_COLOR);

glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(struct Vertex), (ptr + 7));
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0);

glGenBuffers(1, &cubeIBO);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeIBO);
glBufferData(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, NUMBER_OF_CUBE_INDICES*sizeof(GLubyte), s_cubeIndices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

The data array look like this:

static float data[] =
{
//  position  //   // color // //UV//
-1.0, +1.0, +1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,
-1.0, -1.0, +1.0,  0,255,0,255, 0,0,
+1.0, +1.0, +1.0,  255,0,255,255, 0,0,
+1.0, -1.0, +1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,

+1.0, +1.0, +1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,
+1.0, -1.0, +1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,
+1.0, +1.0, -1.0,  255,255,0,255, 0,0,
+1.0, -1.0, -1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,

+1.0, +1.0, -1.0,  255,0,255,255, 0,0,
+1.0, -1.0, -1.0,  255,255,0,255, 0,0,
-1.0, +1.0, -1.0,  0,255,0,255, 0,0,
-1.0, -1.0, -1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,

-1.0, +1.0, -1.0,  0,0,255,255, 0,0,
-1.0, -1.0, -1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,
-1.0, +1.0, +1.0,  255,255,0,255, 0,0,
-1.0, -1.0, +1.0,  255,0,0,255, 0,0,
};

And this is my render code:

glClearColor(0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 1.0f);
glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT|GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeVBO);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeIBO);
glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, NUMBER_OF_CUBE_INDICES, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, s_cubeIndices);

Also I tried to use DrawArrays function without index buffer but result was the same - no geometry rendered. There is also GLError 1282 in output window while my program runs. I'd appreciate any help on my problem, thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Since I don't see Vertex defined, is sizeof(struct Vertex) going to be equal to sizeof(GLfloat)*9 (the stride per vertex in that data array)? –  Doug Kavendek Oct 2 '12 at 14:12
    
This is Vertex struct: struct Vertex { GLfloat x, y, z; GLfloat r, g, b, a; GLfloat u, v; }; So yes, it just GLFloat*9 –  user1687498 Oct 2 '12 at 14:18

2 Answers 2

When you are using buffer object, last parameter of glVertexAttribPointer should be offset to data you need. For example, yours ATTRIB_VERTEX array would start at offset 0, ATTRIB_COLOR array at offset sizeof(float) * 3 (because position takes three floats), etc...

When you are not using buffer objects, but rather vertex array, you have to unbind currently bound buffer object to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER target by calling

glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
OpenGL doc says that the last parameter of glVertexAttribPointer is a pointer to the first component of the first generic vertex attribute in the array. And sizeof(float) * 3 gives only offset from beginning of the array, which is not that I need here. –  user1687498 Oct 2 '12 at 14:37
3  
The docs also elaborate to say: "If a non-zero named buffer object is bound to the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER target while a generic vertex attribute array is specified, pointer is treated as a byte offset into the buffer object's data store." –  Doug Kavendek Oct 2 '12 at 14:40

Ok, I got it working using glVertexPointer and glEnableClientState functions. But for glVertexAttribPointer and glEnableVertexAttribArray there is still no geometry rendering for some reason. Now the code looks like this: VBO init:

struct Vertex
{
  GLfloat x, y, z;
  GLubyte r, g, b, a;
};
......

const GLsizeiptr data_size = NUMBER_OF_CUBE_VERTICES *sizeof(struct Vertex);
glGenBuffers(1, &cubeVBO);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeVBO);

glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, data_size, vertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(struct Vertex), (GLvoid*)((char*)NULL));
glColorPointer(4, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, sizeof(struct Vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(struct Vertex, r));
glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
glEnableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);

rendering:

glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, cubeVBO);
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 0, NUMBER_OF_CUBE_VERTICES);

I have no idea why this code not work if I switch to the glVertexAttribPointer / glEnableVertexAttribArray. Any Ideas? Maybe I need to move pointing and enabling functions from initialization part to render part?

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, are glVertexAttribPointer functions anywhere better than glVertexPointer? Thanks. –  user1687498 Oct 2 '12 at 19:54
1  
The difference between two is that glVertexPointer is used to specify vertices' coordinates while with glVertexAttribPointer you can specify any data for vertices like colour, texture coordinates, normals and ofc, coordinates (position). Difference is also that glVertexAttribPointer is used (only!) in combination with vertex and/or fragment shader, while glVertexPointer is usually used in fixed-function pipeline. You can either stick with OpenGL 1.1 (fixed-function) or learn GLSL and use shaders. –  Srđan Oct 2 '12 at 21:08
1  
That's code from iOS OpenGL template I suppose. So ATTRIB_VERTEX and ATTRIB_COLOR are just locations of input variables to vertex shader. Those are not OpenGL macros. –  Srđan Oct 2 '12 at 21:13
    
Thanks, I've got the picture now –  user1687498 Oct 3 '12 at 11:00

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