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I have a Spring 3.1 @Configuration that needs a property foo to build a bean. The property is defined in defaults.properties but may be overridden by the property in overrides.properties if the application has an active override Spring profile.

Without the override, the code would look like this, and work...

@Configuration
@PropertySource("classpath:defaults.properties")
public class MyConfiguration {

    @Autowired
    private Environment environment;

    @Bean
    public Bean bean() {
        ...
        // this.environment.getRequiredProperty("foo");
        ...
    }
}

I would like a @PropertySource for classpath:overrides.properties contingent on @Profile("overrides"). Does anyone have any ideas on how this could be achieved? Some options I've considered are a duplicate @Configuration, but that would violate DRY, or programmatic manipulation of the ConfigurableEnvironment, but I'm not sure where the environment.getPropertySources.addFirst() call would go.

Placing the following in an XML configuration works if I inject the property directly with @Value, but not when I use Environment and the getRequiredProperty() method.

<context:property-placeholder ignore-unresolvable="true" location="classpath:defaults.properties"/>

<beans profile="overrides">
    <context:property-placeholder ignore-unresolvable="true" order="0"
                                  location="classpath:overrides.properties"/>
</beans>

Update

If you're trying to do this now, check out Spring Boot's YAML support, particularly the 'Using YAML instead of Properties' section. The profile support there would make this question moot, but there isn't @PropertySource support yet.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Add the overriding @PropertySource in a static inner class. Unfortunately, you must specify all property sources together which means creating a "default" profile as the alternative to "override".

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration
{
    @Configuration
    @Profile("default")
    @PropertySource("classpath:defaults.properties")
    static class Defaults
    { }

    @Configuration
    @Profile("override")
    @PropertySource({"classpath:defaults.properties", "classpath:overrides.properties"})
    static class Overrides
    {
        // nothing needed here if you are only overriding property values
    }

    @Autowired
    private Environment environment;

    @Bean
    public Bean bean() {
        ...
        // this.environment.getRequiredProperty("foo");
        ...
    }
}
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You can do:

  <context:property-placeholder location="classpath:${spring.profiles.active}.properties" />

Edit: if you need something more advanced, you can register your PropertySources on application startup.

web.xml

  <context-param>
    <param-name>contextInitializerClasses</param-name>
    <param-value>com.xxx.core.spring.properties.PropertySourcesApplicationContextInitializer</param-value>
  </context-param>

file you create:

public class PropertySourcesApplicationContextInitializer implements ApplicationContextInitializer<ConfigurableApplicationContext> {

  private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(PropertySourcesApplicationContextInitializer.class);

  @Override
  public void initialize(ConfigurableApplicationContext applicationContext) {
    LOGGER.info("Adding some additional property sources");
    String[] profiles = applicationContext.getEnvironment().getActiveProfiles()
    // ... Add property sources according to selected spring profile 
    // (note there already are some property sources registered, system properties etc)
    applicationContext.getEnvironment().getPropertySources().addLast(myPropertySource);
  }

}

Once you've done it you just need to add in your context:

<context:property-placeholder/>

I can't really answer to your question about multiple profiles but I guess you activate them on such an initializer, and you could register the appropriate PropertySource items during profile activations.

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Doesn't that assume only one profile is active? –  Emerson Farrugia Dec 4 '12 at 11:20
2  
You can access the parsed list of active profiles as an array using applicationContext.getEnvironment().getActiveProfiles() –  David Harkness Jan 5 '13 at 0:14
    
That's right, you can do both. At that time I didn't know we could pass multiple profiles ;) –  Sebastien Lorber Jan 5 '13 at 0:44
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I can't think of any other way than one you have suggested Emerson, which is to define this bean in a separate @Configuration file with an @Profile annotation:

@Configuration
@Profile("override")
@PropertySource("classpath:override.properties")
public class OverriddenConfig {

    @Autowired
    private Environment environment;

    @Bean
    public Bean bean() {
        //if..
    }
}
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Note: This answer provides an alternate solution to using properties files with @PropertySource. I went this route because it was too cumbersome trying to work with multiple properties files that may each have overrides while avoiding repetitive code.

Create a POJO interface for each related set of properties to define their names and types.

public interface DataSourceProperties
{
    String driverClassName();
    String url();
    String user();
    String password();
}

Implement to return the default values.

public class DefaultDataSourceProperties implements DataSourceProperties
{
     public String driverClassName() { return "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"; }
     ...
}

Subclass for each profile (e.g. development, production) and override any values that differ from the default. This requires a set of mutually-exclusive profiles, but you can easily add "default" as the alternative to "overrides".

@Profile("production")
@Configuration
public class ProductionDataSourceProperties extends DefaultDataSourceProperties
{
     // nothing to override as defaults are for production
}

@Profile("development")
@Configuration
public class DevelopmentDataSourceProperties extends DefaultDataSourceProperties
{
     public String user() { return "dev"; }
     public String password() { return "dev"; }
}

Finally, autowire the properties configurations into the other configurations that need them. The advantage here is that you don't repeat any @Bean creation code.

@Configuration
public class DataSourceConfig
{
    @Autowired
    private DataSourceProperties properties;

    @Bean
    public DataSource dataSource() {
        BoneCPDataSource source = new BoneCPDataSource();
        source.setJdbcUrl(properties.url());
        ...
        return source;
    }
}

I am still not convinced I'll stick with this over manually configuring properties files based on the active profiles in a servlet context initializer. My thought was that doing manual configuration would not be as amenable to unit testing, but I'm not so sure now. I really prefer reading properties files to a list of property accessors.

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