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Are there issues with returning a new instance from an accessor? If so, is there a better approach?

public class Person
{
    private RecIpDet _ipDet;
    public RecIpDet IpDet
    {
        get 
        {                 
            if(_ipDet == null)
                _ipDet = new RecIpDet();
            return _ipDet; 
        }
    } 
}
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4  
Curious, why aren't you setting _ipDet to the new instance? –  James Michael Hare Oct 2 '12 at 14:10
    
My fault that should be changed. –  Chace Fields Oct 2 '12 at 14:13
1  
So what is the question then? Now, the get accessor isn't returning a new instance. The question doesn't match the title. –  FishBasketGordo Oct 2 '12 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are issues, because you never set your field, so you'll return a new object everytime the property is called.

You should set _ipDet if it's null, and then return it. This is called lazy instantiation or lazy initialization.

public class Person
{
    private RecIpDet _ipDet;

    public RecIpDet IpDet
    {
        get 
        {                 
            if (_ipDet == null)
            {
                _ipDet = new RecIpDet();
            }

            return _ipDet; 
        }
    } 
}

Keep in mind, this is not thread-safe, so if that's a factor for you, you'll need a more robust mechanism. For single threaded applications, this method of lazy instantiation is fine.

If you're using .NET 4.0 or higher, you can use the Lazy<T> class, which I believe is thread-safe:

public class Person
{
    private Lazy<RecIpDet> _ipDet = new Lazy<RecIpDet>(() => new RecIpDet());

    public RecIpDet IpDet
    {
        get 
        {                 
            return _ipDet.Value; 
        }
    } 
}
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Based on your comment, it does appear you meant to set the instance, so this is a classic example of lazy instantiation which is fine (though not thread-safe). If you do not need to worry about thread safety, then by all means this will work:

get
{
    if (_ipDet == null)
        _ipDet = new RecIpDet();

    return _ipDet
}

But if you're in .NET 4.0 I'd recommend Lazy<T> instead of building your own lazy construction:

public class Person
{
    private Lazy<RecIpDet> _ipDet = new Lazy<RecIpDet>();

    public RecIpDet IpDet
    {
        get { return _ipDet.Value; }
    } 
}

Lazy's Value calls the constructor for the type on first call and is thread-safe (you can choose different) levels of thread-safety as well..

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As of now you will always return a new object. Unless somehow _ipDet got set to a value. This makes your code behave very unpredictable. Either implement the singleton pattern and replace return new RecIpDet(); with _ipDet = new RecIpDet(); or make it always return a new object, which is fine.

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For us it is common practice to use:

get
{
    return _ipDet ?? (_ipDet = new RecIpDet());
}
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It's quite unusual to use Lazy Instantiation, most of the time it's for the Singleton pattern, here you'll find more info on that :

Implementing Singleton pattern

In this page you'll even find a way to make it thread-safe.

It can be very useful for global objects that can be accessed from anywhere in your application.

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