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What is the correct way of reading from a TCP socket in C/C++?

I'm trying to develop a TCP client/server. My problem is, when I try to send the data from cliente I do it in one sent.

But my problem appears when I try to receive the data with a specific structure, I mean, the first 8 bytes set a date, the next 10 a name, and undefined number of bytes set a text (this text ends with /r/n/r/n)

The client sends as follows:

char date[8];
char name[10];
char msg[4096];

strcpy(msg,"12/10/12"); //8 bytes
strcat(msg,"Kevin Fire"); //10 bytes
strcat(msg,"abcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcdeabcde\r\n\r\n");

nbytes_sent = send(sock,(char *)msg,sizeof(msg),0);
printf("Bytes_sent: %s -> %i\n",msg,nbytes_sent);

And the server try to parse the data from socket as follows:

char date[8];
char name[10];
char * text;
char buf[1024];

int i=0;
for(i=0; i < 8; i++)
    date[i] = '\0';
for(i=0; i < 10; i++)
    name[i] = '\0';

nbytes_read=recv(sclient,(char *)date,sizeof(date),0);
if(nbytes_read > 0){
    printf("Date: %s (%i)\n",date,nbytes_read);
    //cout.flush();
    nbytes_read=recv(sclient,(char *)name,sizeof(name),0);
    if(nbytes_read > 0){
        printf("Name: %s (%i)\n",name,nbytes_read);
        //cout.flush();
        nbytes_read=recv(sclient,(char *)buf,sizeof(buf),0);
        strcpy(text,buf);
        while(nbytes_read > 0){
            nbytes_read=recv(sclient(char*)buf,sizeof(buf),0);
            strcat(text,buf);
        }
    }
}

printf("Date: %s. Name: %s. Text: %s\n",date,name,text);
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by grieve, Florent, Sergey K., Vikdor, Graviton Oct 4 '12 at 9:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
1. How about upping your accept rate? 2. What's the actual problem? –  Benj Oct 2 '12 at 14:09
1  
What is the problem? (You may want to review your accept rate) –  hmjd Oct 2 '12 at 14:10
    
@hmjd Hehe, Snap! –  Benj Oct 2 '12 at 14:10
    
Let me guess, one or all of the recv calls doesn't return the exact amount you ask for? Or that the strings you print out aren't properly terminated? –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 2 '12 at 14:13
1  
If you don't like the tags, edit the tags. If it is C, which it looks like, then it probably compiles under a C++ compliler. Stop fetishizing accept rate. People care about the most upvoted answers, not the accepted answers. Some of the users of this site make my head hurt. –  frankc Oct 2 '12 at 14:21

3 Answers 3

Here's a simple "receive all" function:

int recv_all(int sockfd, void *buf, size_t len, int flags)
{
    size_t toread = len;
    char  *bufptr = (char*) buf;

    while (toread > 0)
    {
        ssize_t rsz = recv(sockfd, bufptr, toread, flags);
        if (rsz <= 0)
            return rsz;  /* Error or other end closed cnnection */

        toread -= rsz;  /* Read less next time */
        bufptr += rsz;  /* Next buffer position to read into */
    }

    return len;
}
share|improve this answer

One (repeated) mistake is:

nbytes_read=recv(sclient,(char *)date,sizeof(date),0);

recv() does not null terminate. This means date will not have a null terminator if sizeof(date) bytes is read. This is a problem when a non-null terminated string is passed as an argument to printf() with "%s" format specifier. If the string is non-null terminated you may see garbage characters appearing after the actual string data. You need to read one less than the target buffer and null terminate or use the format specifier "%*.s" that does not require null termination:

printf("%.*s", n, s); /* Prints first 'n' bytes from 's'. */

Note you can initialise a char[] to all nulls instead of using a for:

char date[8] = "";

or you can use memset().

share|improve this answer

Adding to @hmjd's find:

declared at the var decls is your text pointer...

char * text;

then later...

strcpy(text,buf);
while(nbytes_read > 0){
   nbytes_read=recv(sclient(char*)buf,sizeof(buf),0);
   strcat(text,buf);
}

Maybe try setting that 'text' pointer to something beside a random stack value will help as well.

Continuing the barrage, though the following will not necessarily blow up, your date variable as:

char date[8];

on both client and server side The client variable isn't used at all. The server variable, however is:

nbytes_read=recv(sclient,(char *)date,sizeof(date),0);
if(nbytes_read > 0){

Problem is, the date you sent is, in fact, 8 chars wide already: "12/10/12". Therefore, even if you firm-up a null terminator on the end of your string, which you should always do regardless (good practice):

date[ sizeof(date)/sizeof(date[0])-1 ] = 0;

you'll be truncating off the last char of your date.

There are other things wrong with this; we've only pointed out a few. Think about sending length-prefixes with each of these data values in the array, with checks or range to ensure you get what you expected.

Finally, spending some time on the business-end of a debugger would probably do you very well, especially on the server side.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 missed that and is likely the problem that the OP is experiencing. –  hmjd Oct 2 '12 at 14:23

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