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I am writing a small implementation of memcpy as follows.

#include "stdio.h"
int main( )
{
    int i=5;
    int j=4;
    printf("i=%d\t",i);
    swap(&i,&j,sizeof(int));
    printf("i=%d",i);
    return 0;
}


int swap(void *vp1,void *vp2,int size)
{
    char *a=(char *)vp1;
    char *b=(char *)vp2;

    for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
    {
        *a=*b;
        a++;
        b++;
    }

    return 0;
}

The output of this code is

i=5 i=33

rather than

i=5 i=4

Can anybody explain what is wrong with the code?

share|improve this question
2  
Works fine for me: i=5 i=4. GCC 4.6.3 on 32-bit Linux. –  jpa Oct 2 '12 at 14:16
1  
Where is memcpy? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 2 '12 at 14:16
2  
Works fine for me on Windows i = 5 and i = 4. –  Tudor Oct 2 '12 at 14:17
3  
There's no prototype for swap in scope when it's called. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 2 '12 at 14:21
3  
Some obvious problems with your code: 1. The memcpy() workalike is named swap(), which is horribly confusing. 2. The signature doesn't match. 3. It fails to use const for the source pointer. 4. Needless casting from void * to char *. 5. Will break if given a negative size. 6. Pointless return value. 7. Calling function without first declaring it isn't a sign of good code hygiene. That said, it looks like it should work. –  unwind Oct 2 '12 at 14:23

1 Answer 1

#include "stdio.h"
int swap(void *vp1,void *vp2,int size)

{

     int i;

    char *a=(char *)vp1;
    char *b=(char *)vp2;

    for(i = 0; i<size;i++)
    {
     *a = *b;
     a++;
     b++;
     }
    return 0;
}

int main( )

{

    int i=5;
    int j=4;
    printf("i=%d\t",i);
    swap(&i,&j,sizeof(int));
    printf("i=%d",i);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Please explain any code solutions you give so that the asker can learn how to solve their problem. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 2 '12 at 17:38
    
You basically switched the declarations of swap and main, it doesn't answer the question at all. –  netcoder Oct 2 '12 at 17:50

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