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I have a div that is absolute positioned (because it holds sub-divs that are themselves absolutely positioned), that I want horizontally centered.

I can achieve that using the following CSS

width : 512px;
position : absolute;
left : 50%;
margin-left :-256px; // half width of div

(complete test in http://jsbin.com/eruwep/2/edit)

However when the window isn't large enough, the div overflows to the left.

Is there a way to have it centered when the page is large enough, but left-justified otherwise (using just CSS)?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why are you using position: absolute for the container? If it's just because you want its absolutely positioned children to be positioned relative to their container, you don't need absolute for that. Any value other than static will do that.

Changing the CSS you mentioned in your question to the following will make it work:

width : 512px;
position : relative;
margin : auto;

Example in: http://jsbin.com/eruwep/3/edit

share|improve this answer
    
position relative on the container works in my case, good point! – Eric Grange Oct 2 '12 at 15:17

You could try media queries: http://jsfiddle.net/RfUZj/

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem to work when the element has "position: absolute" (jsfiddle.net/T7w6z) – Eric Grange Oct 2 '12 at 14:24
1  
I was giving you an easier more semantic alternative, position absolute isn't nice if you want elements to move around, change your code to use margin: 0 auto; – Andy Oct 2 '12 at 14:25
    
The sub-divs are positioned relative to their parent container (so position: absolute), rather than relative to their default position (position:relative) – Eric Grange Oct 2 '12 at 15:16

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