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Say I have two divs next to each other (take https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/home as reference) with a border.

Is there a way (preferably a CSS trick) to prevent my divs from appearing like having a double border? Have a look at this image to better understand what I mean:

"Double" border

You can see that where the two divs meet, it appears like they have a double border.

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A table, you mean? 😊 –  qwzjk Oct 2 '12 at 14:20
    
no, I am using this with isotope so can't use a table. divs have different sizes –  john smith Oct 2 '12 at 14:23
    
Is it only an issue for you left-right, or do you also need to worry about it top-bottom? –  VictorKilo Oct 2 '12 at 15:18

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

#divNumberOne { border-right: 0; }

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no. i need to be able to apply this to many elements. –  john smith Oct 2 '12 at 14:22
4  
This is the only real way of doing it that doesn't mess other stuff up. If you need to do multiple elements, hell, say 100 divs, you could do div { border-right: none; } div:last-child { border-right: 1px solid black; } which would give you the intended effect –  Andy Oct 2 '12 at 14:24
    
yea, it can always be done that way, but i was wondering if there was a pure-css way of doing it, without having to use more than one class (i will have more rows and columns) –  john smith Oct 2 '12 at 14:27
3  
This is pure css, I used a pseudo class (last child) so I haven't modified the html in anyway, there are many pseudo classes and I would say go down this route as I don't think there is an alternative –  Andy Oct 2 '12 at 14:28
    
Look into Nth Child you can do it this way using odd and even or depending on your layout you can calculate it the way you want. –  MaxwellLynn Feb 2 at 17:50

HTML:

<div>1</div>
<div>2</div>
<div>3</div>
<div>4</div>

​CSS:

div {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    float: left;
}

div:nth-child(n+2) {
    margin-left: -1px;
}

Demo

Include ie9.js for IE8 support (it's very useful for all CSS selectors/pseudo-elements).

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if you have more than one row first div in second row have no left border and with this trick divs alignment go to left for 1px –  afshin Oct 2 '12 at 15:08
    
Wasn't there no more complicated version? What about elements with a larger right-margin? –  feeela Oct 2 '12 at 15:11
    
@afshin if i don't see his layout how can i give a specific answer? –  Giona Oct 2 '12 at 15:11
    
@feeela i think it's pretty basic. Anyway, right-margin doesn't affect left-margin: jsfiddle.net/gionaf/D6tHK/1 –  Giona Oct 2 '12 at 15:13

If we're talking about elements that cannot be guaranteed to appear in any particular order (maybe 3 elements in one row, followed by a row with 2 elements, etc.), you want something that can be placed on every element in the collection. This solution should cover that:

.collection {
    /* these styles are optional here, you might not need/want them */
    margin-top: -1px;
    margin-left: -1px;
}

.collection .child {
    outline: 1px solid; /* use instead of border */
    margin-top: 1px;
    margin-left: 1px;
}

Note that outline doesn't work in older browsers.

Alternately, you can stick with the borders and use negative margins:

.collection .child {
    margin-top: -1px;
    margin-left: -1px;
}
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Thank you for sharing this. I literally was working on this for hours, going down the border (instead of outline) path. This worked beautifully! –  Jessy Houle Sep 2 '13 at 4:15
    
This is a really clever technique. Cheers! –  da5id Nov 29 '13 at 20:41

If the divs all have the same class name:

div.things {
    border: 1px solid black;
    border-left: none;
}

div.things:first-child {
    border-right: 1px solid black;
}

There's a JSFiddle demo here.

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+1 One of the few pseudo classes, that are recognized by IE 7+8… –  feeela Oct 2 '12 at 15:09
  <div class="one"></div>
  <div class="two"></div>
  <div class="two"></div>
  <div class="two"></div>
  <div class="two"></div>

CSS:

  .one{
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    border:thin red solid;
    float:left;
  }
.two{
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    border-style: solid solid solid none;

    border-color:red;
    border-width:1px;
    float:left;
}

jsFiddle

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Another solution one might consider is using the CSS Adjacent sibling selector.

The CSS

div {
    border: 1px solid black;
}

div + div {
    border-left: 1px solid transparent;
}

jsFiddle

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Add the following CSS to the div on the right:

position: relative;
left: -1px; /* your border-width times -1 */

Or just remove one of the borders.

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What about giving a margin:1px; around your div.

<html>
<style>
.brd{width:100px;height:100px;background:#c0c0c0;border:1px solid red;float:left;margin:1px;}
</style>
<body>
    <div class="brd"></div>
    <div class="brd"></div>
    <div class="brd"></div>
</body>
</html>

DEMO

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I prefer to use another div behind them as background and delete all the borders. You need just to calculate the size of the background div and the position of the foreground divs.

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I do think my solution is the best although the critics. It's the same principe as drawing a 1px table : –  well7m Oct 3 '12 at 7:09

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