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Consider the following code:

class Base(object):

    @classmethod
    def do(cls, a):
        print cls, a

class Derived(Base):

    @classmethod
    def do(cls, a):
        print 'In derived!'
        # Base.do(cls, a) -- can't pass `cls`
        Base.do(a)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    d = Derived()
    d.do('hello')

> $ python play.py  
> In derived! 
> <class '__main__.Base'> msg

From Derived.do, how do I call Base.do? I would normally use super or even the base class name directly if this is a normal object method, but apparently I can't find a way to call the classmethod in the base class. In the above example, Base.do(a) prints Base class instead of Derived class.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted
super(Derived, cls).do(a)

EDIT: Oh, wait a minute... it's not clear exactly what you're asking. This is how you would invoke the code in the base class's version of the method, from the derived class.

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2  
uh uh .. how come it never occured to me that I can use super on classmethods too. –  Sridhar Ratnakumar Aug 12 '09 at 23:11
    
this only works (due to a limitation imposed by super) if the base derives from object, right? what do you do if that's not the case? –  ars-longa-vita-brevis Jun 11 at 19:06
    
Yeah, this only works for new-style classes, which derive from object. (at least in Python 2, but in Py3 I think all classes are new-style, IIRC) Otherwise you have to do Base.do(self, ...), I think, thereby hard-coding the name of the superclass. –  David Z Jun 11 at 19:29

this has been a while, but I think I may have found an answer. When you decorate a method to become a classmethod the original unbound method is stored in a property named 'im_func':

class Base(object):
    @classmethod
    def do(cls, a):
        print cls, a

class Derived(Base):

    @classmethod
    def do(cls, a):
        print 'In derived!'
        # Base.do(cls, a) -- can't pass `cls`
        Base.do.im_func(cls, a)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    d = Derived()
    d.do('hello')
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1  
Note: This approach works for old style classes where super() doesn't work –  Alex Q Jun 2 '11 at 20:36
    
Also available as __func__ in python 2.7 and 3 –  dtheodor Apr 29 at 20:09

This works for me:

Base.do('hi')
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6  
The cls argument will then be bound to Base instead of Derived –  Sridhar Ratnakumar Aug 12 '09 at 23:14
    
what works for me is this - which looks (a lot) like Ned's answer: where self derives from QGraphicsView which has paintEvent(QPaintEvent) def paintEvent (self, qpntEvent): print dir(self) QGraphicsView.paintEvent(self, qpntEvent) –  user192127 Mar 31 '12 at 15:54

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