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I am trying to append a lengthy list of rows to the same variable. It works great for the first thousand or so iterations in the loop (all of which have the same lengths), but then, near the end of the file, the rows get a bit shorter, and while I still want to append them, I am not sure how to handle it.

The script gives me an out of range error, as expected.

Here is what the part of code in question looks like:

    ii = 0
    NNCat = []
    NNCatelogue = []
    while ii <= len(lines):

        NNCat = (ev_id[ii], nn1[ii], nn2[ii], nn3[ii], nn4[ii], nn5[ii], nn6[ii], nn7[ii], nn8[ii], nn9[ii], nn10[ii], nn11[ii])
        NNCatelogue.append(NNCat)
        ii = ii + 1



    print NNCatelogue, ii

Any help on this would be greatly appreciated!

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Have you tried to make to short rows as long as the longest by appending zeros or nan's or what ever you prefer? –  Daniel Thaagaard Andreasen Oct 2 '12 at 14:32
    
I have thought of that, though I'm not sure how to automate that. –  user1620716 Oct 2 '12 at 14:33
2  
short_list += [0]*(len(long_list) - len(short_list)) I think should work –  Joran Beasley Oct 2 '12 at 14:34
    
Try to see if the length of a vector is as long as the maximum length. If not, append a zero. –  Daniel Thaagaard Andreasen Oct 2 '12 at 14:34
    
If you have another way of specifying NNCat, you could just append shorter tuples near the end of NNCatelogue. It depends on whether you prefer rows to have the same length or it doesn't matter (having them all be the same length could make it easier to process the data in the future). I would just update whatever parses the data from the line to add placeholders for the missing data. –  jeff.vanvoorst Oct 2 '12 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll answer the question you didn't ask first ;) : how can this code be more pythonic?

Instead of

ii = 0
NNCat = []
NNCatelogue = []
while ii <= len(lines):

    NNCat = (ev_id[ii], nn1[ii], nn2[ii], nn3[ii], nn4[ii], nn5[ii], nn6[ii], nn7[ii], nn8[ii], nn9[ii], nn10[ii], nn11[ii])
    NNCatelogue.append(NNCat)
    ii = ii + 1

you should do

NNCat = []
NNCatelogue = []
for ii, line in enumerate(lines):

    NNCat = (ev_id[ii], nn1[ii], nn2[ii], nn3[ii], nn4[ii], nn5[ii], nn6[ii],
             nn7[ii], nn8[ii], nn9[ii], nn10[ii], nn11[ii])
    NNCatelogue.append(NNCat)

During each pass ii will be incremented by one for you and line will be the current line.

As for your short lines, you have two choices

  • Use a special value (such as None) to fill in when you don't have a real value
  • check the length of nn1, nn2, ..., nn11 to see if they are large enough

The second solution will be much more verbose, hard to maintain, and confusing. I strongly recommend using None (or another special value you create yourself) as a placeholder when there is no data.

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1  
I'd go a couple steps further in Python-izing that code - why is NNCat necessary? The entire thing could be reduced to a list comprehension: NNCatelogue = [(ev_id[ii], ..., nn11[ii])for ii in xrange(0, len(lines))] –  Peter Sobot Oct 2 '12 at 15:06
    
Thank you for the more Pythonic tip! Also, I apologize for the delay in my response. Hmm... what might be a proper way of adding "None" values? The rows that are shorter are of unequal lengths. –  user1620716 Oct 2 '12 at 18:58
    
@user1620716: How are you constructing ev_id, nn1', ..., nn11? That would be the place to add None` if there is no value in the data. –  Ethan Furman Oct 2 '12 at 20:35
def gvop(vals,indx): #get values or padding
    return vals[indx] if indx<len(vals) else None

NNCatelogue = [(gvop(ev_id,ii), gvop(nn1,ii), gvop(nn2,ii), gvop(nn3,ii), gvop(nn4,ii),
                gvop(nn5,ii), gvop(nn6,ii), gvop(nn7,ii), gvop(nn8,ii), gvop(nn9,ii),
                gvop(nn10,ii), gvop(nn11,ii)) for ii in xrange(0, len(lines))]

By defining this other function to return either the correct value or padding, you can ensure rows are the same length. You can change the padding to anything, if None is not what you want.

Then the list comp creates a list of tuples as before, except containing padding in cases where some of the lines in the input are shorter.

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from itertools import izip_longest
NNCatelogue = list(izip_longest(ev_id, nn1, nn2, ... nn11, fillvalue=None))

See here for documentation of izip. Do yourself a favour and skip the list around the iterator, if you don't need it. In many cases you can use the iterator as well as the list, and you save a lot of memory. Especially if you have long lists, that you're grouping together here.

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