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I have a sql server nvarchar field with a "Default Value or Binding" of empty string. It also happens to be a not null field.

Does this mean that there is no default or that it is a default of a string with no characters in it.

If I don't insert a value, will it insert with an empty string or fail with a "not null" error?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The default is a blank (empty) string.

If you don't provide a value, the insert will be successful and the value will be blank, not null.

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Its the same as (assuming data is the col in question):

create table #t (id int, data varchar(100) not null default(''))

So:

insert into #t (id) values (1) 
insert into #t (id,data) values (2,default) 
insert into #t (id,data) values (3, 'allowed') 

select * from #t

will return

1
2
3 allowed 

and ..

insert into #t (id,data) values (1, null) 
-- will error
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If you have a true empty string as a default, then it will autopopulate with a 0 length string.

You should be careful to ensure it is a 0 length string and not nothing though. If for instance you are looking in the table builder gui for SSMS and it shows a blank for "Default Value or Binding", that means that there is no default value and an insert will fail if it is not populated. If you want it to have a 0 length string, populate it with '' (two single-quotes together with nothing in between.)

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Default value for a column is just that - sql server will put that value when you dont supply one for the column. The value in the column will be an empty string. Not null error will not happen

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