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Ruby: Sorting 2 arrays using values from one of them

I have an array that looks like this:

a = [[0,1], [1,2], [2,3]]

and an array b like this:

b = [5, 3, 4]

The elements in b correspond to the elements in a on the same index. I want to sort band at the same time the elements in a to change order in the same way as b.

So for the above example I would get:

a = [[1, 2], [2, 3], [0, 1]] and b = [3, 4, 5]

How can I do that?

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marked as duplicate by the Tin Man, Sergey K., Lev Levitsky, Mark, Clyde Lobo Oct 3 '12 at 12:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This question might help you. –  Andy H Oct 2 '12 at 15:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
a = [[0,1], [1,2], [2,3]]
b = [5, 3, 4]
a, b = b.zip(a).sort.transpose
p b #=> [[1, 2], [2, 3], [0, 1]]

To see how this works, just look at the result of p b.zip(a); then p b.zip(a).transpose.

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I would prefer sort_by(&:first) –  Victor Moroz Oct 2 '12 at 15:17
    
@VictorMoroz Or sort_by(&:join) to sort by all digits. –  Robert K Oct 2 '12 at 15:24
    
@RobertK: But what happens when you have things like [11, 1] and [1, 11]? –  mu is too short Oct 2 '12 at 15:38
    
Ruby can sort by array, why bother using first ,last or even join? Just use [[11,1],[1,11]].sort, you will get [[1, 11], [11, 1]] –  texasbruce Oct 2 '12 at 15:43
    
Removed clumsy double sort. –  steenslag Oct 2 '12 at 15:45

Here's a quick benchmark to show the outputs and execution times:

require 'benchmark'
require 'pp'

a = [[0,1], [1,2], [2,3]]
b = [5, 3, 4]

pp a.sort_by.with_index{|_,i| b[i]}

a,b = b.zip(a).sort.transpose 
pp b

a = [[0,1], [1,2], [2,3]]
b = [5, 3, 4]
n = 1_000_000

puts "Using #{n} iterations:"
Benchmark.bm(7) do |bench|
  bench.report('sort_by') { n.times { a.sort_by.with_index{|_,i| b[i]} } }
  bench.report('zip')     { n.times { b.zip(a).sort.transpose } }
end

Here's the output:

[[1, 2], [2, 3], [0, 1]]
[[1, 2], [2, 3], [0, 1]]
Using 1000000 iterations:
              user     system      total        real
sort_by   2.370000   0.000000   2.370000 (  2.371345)
zip       2.730000   0.000000   2.730000 (  2.730663)
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Thanks for the data man. And this is the performance for only array of 3 items. –  texasbruce Oct 2 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, only three, done a million times. It'd be all relative with variations on the iterations or the array sizes. –  the Tin Man Oct 2 '12 at 18:17

Even though @steenslag gives a good solution, I would still not recommend using zip for its low performance, especially if the arrays are large because it generates an intermediate array.

The following code is more straight forward:

a = [[0,1], [1,2], [2,3]]
b = [5, 3, 4]
p a.sort_by.with_index{|_,i| b[i]}

Output:

[[1, 2], [2, 3], [0, 1]]
share|improve this answer
    
Even I give a good solution? :) –  steenslag Oct 2 '12 at 15:52
    
@steenslag Even Ruby is not very good at performance, I would still try to minimize the performance issue. Your solution will iterate a and b once each, generate an intermediate array with size a+b, and then generates an intermediate hash for sorting. Mine iterates a once, then generates a sorting hash :) –  texasbruce Oct 2 '12 at 16:02

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