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I count values from multiple columns like this:

SELECT COUNT(column1),column1 FROM table GROUP BY column1
SELECT COUNT(column2),column2 FROM table GROUP BY column2
SELECT COUNT(column3),column3 FROM table GROUP BY column3

This returns for example for column1 array(attr1 => 2000, attr2 => 3000...) (Each column has specific and few values). The problem is that "table" in my application can be a query with some joins and where clauses, that may take 0.1sec. By doing all that counts "table" is computed each time again which is not necessary. Is there any way to take the results i want with one query, or "cache" the query that produces table? Otherwise i believe denormalization would be the only solution here. And i want the same results with the above queries. I am using mysql-myisam.

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How can the number of rows differ for each column on the same table? –  Kermit Oct 2 '12 at 15:15
    
can you store your query results in a temp table? –  Beth Oct 2 '12 at 15:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's hard to know how to help you without understanding the context / structure of your data, but I believe this might help you:

SELECT 
     SUM(CASE WHEN column1 IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS column1_count
    ,SUM(CASE WHEN column2 IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS column2_count
    ,SUM(CASE WHEN column3 IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS column3_count
FROM table
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One solution is to wrap it in a subquery

SELECT *
FROM
(
    SELECT COUNT(column1),column1 FROM table GROUP BY column1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT COUNT(column2),column2 FROM table GROUP BY column2
    UNION ALL
    SELECT COUNT(column3),column3 FROM table GROUP BY column3
) s
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Will this not "compute" the table multiple times? –  Miserable Variable Oct 2 '12 at 15:17
    
It would have to calculate it three times regardless. You can't group by three different fields and expect the system to not have to recalculate for each different grouping. On it's face that's impossible. Putting them into a single query may allow the system to reuse the view, but if not I would investigate indexes or, failing that, temporary tables. –  Bacon Bits Oct 2 '12 at 15:35
    
I have indexes in all columns that need count. This query is not optimized, because table must be a subquery (SELECT column1 FROM table JOIN table2 ON ... WHERE ....) and it calculates subqueries again. I was thinking of denormalization so that i don't have joins.. Creating temporary tables is also a little time consuming.. –  user666 Oct 2 '12 at 15:44

You didn't say which database server you are using, but if temp tables are available they may be the best approach.

// table is a temp table
select ... into #table ....
SELECT COUNT(column1),column1 FROM #table GROUP BY column1  
SELECT COUNT(column2),column2 FROM #table GROUP BY column2  
SELECT COUNT(column3),column3 FROM #table GROUP BY column3  
// drop may not be required
drop table #table
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Yes i can create temporary tables, (mysql community server) but i don't think it will have a great improve in performance, as creating a temporary table takes me about 1 sec. The queries i do take 0.1-0.2 sec and all together around 1 sec. (Don't you mean CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE AS {query} ?) –  user666 Oct 2 '12 at 15:39
    
I believe on Sybase database servers the above syntax (table name starting with #) creates a temporary table, which is typically stored in memory. That doesn't seem to be the case for you, resulting in expensive disk i/o. With in-memory tables, if the resulting size is not too big temp tables should help –  Miserable Variable Oct 2 '12 at 16:12

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