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I have a C function receiving a uint8 pointer with another parameter which is its size (number of bytes).

I want to extract double data from this buffer. Here is my code:

Write(uint8* data, uint8 size) /* data and size are given by a callback to my function)*/
{
    double d;
    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        d = ((double*)&data)[i];
        printf(" d = %d\n");
    }
}

The problem is that I am not receiving what I am sending within an external hardware. I guess that my cast is wrong. I tried other methods but without any good result. I am still not able to get what I send.

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1  
How are you putting the double into the data stream? I.E. How are you getting the uint8 as it maybe in network byte order which could possibly be different than your computers byte ordering. –  sean Oct 2 '12 at 15:18
1  
Almost everything about this code is hair-raising. What is the exact format of the data you are receiving? –  Kerrek SB Oct 2 '12 at 15:18
    
Like Kerrek SB said, there are many, different problems with this code. Including the fact that your "printf()" doesn't use "d". –  paulsm4 Oct 2 '12 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand your question (it's not entirely clear if there's at most one double to extract or there can be many), here's what I would try doing:

double Write(uint8* data, uint8 size)
{
    double d;

    if (size < sizeof(d))
        return 0; // failure; you may want something smarter than this

    memcpy(&d, data, sizeof(d));

    return d;
}

What this avoids is a potential alignment issue in a cast like d = *(double*)data.

This may fail in odd and ugly ways if the data does not represent a valid double, specifically if it's reversed (e.g. your hardware is little-endian and the CPU running this code is big-endian or the other way around).

I don't know yet if aliasing issues apply. Need to read the standard again. Never saw them in practice, though.

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I think that this solution is more safe! Thank you! –  HADJ AMOR HASSEN Oct 2 '12 at 16:00
    
NOTHING is "safe" unless you know for sure the actual format! Otherwise, you're just guessing. And "guessing" is always Bad. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Oct 2 '12 at 21:04

Assuming your data is actually an array of doubles and size is the number of bytes, your code should look something like this:

Write(uint8* data, uint8 size) /* data and size are given by a callback to my function)*/
{
  double d;
  int i;
  for (i=0; i<size/sizeof(double); ++i) {
    d = ((double*)data)[i];
    printf(" d = %g\n",d);
  }
}

Most likely, size is the number of bytes and not the number of doubles, so you have to divide size by the size of a double to get the actual number of doubles:

If you do this:

    d = ((double*)&data)[i];

then you are saying that the pointer to the pointer to the data is a double pointer.

Also, your printf statement was like this:

printf(" d = %d\n");

You were telling it to print an int (%d is an int), and not giving it an actual value to print. I changed that to %g, which prints a double in best-fit format.

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You're assuming that "data" is an array of doubles, and assuming that "size" is the #/doubles. We simply don't know - the OP needs to tell us. –  paulsm4 Oct 2 '12 at 15:26
    
Thank you very much.. I have a warning about signed/unsigned mismatch.. I receive what I send now. but it seems that i is always equal to 0. –  HADJ AMOR HASSEN Oct 2 '12 at 15:33
    
I have no documentation about size and data.. all what I know is these parameters are given to me from a dll. I am changing an existing code dealing with TCP/IP with ethernet connection.. In my actual configuration, I have two computers connected via Ethernet. Computer 1, changes one or more variables, and computer 2 receives this data. I think that data represents the modified variable in computer 1 and not an array of all computer 1 variables.. –  HADJ AMOR HASSEN Oct 2 '12 at 15:38
Write(uint8* data, uint8 size) /* data and size are given by a callback to my function)*/
 {

  double d;
  for (i=0; i<size; i++) {
  d = ((double*)data)[i];
  printf(" d = %d\n", d);
  }

 }

is what im guessing you're looking for, the pointer is actually a pointer to an array of doubles so you just cast it to exactly that

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