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I just find out that standard std deque is really slow when comparing with my "home-made" version of stack that use pre-allocated array.
This is code of my stack:

template <class T>
class FastStack
{    
public:
    T* st;
    int allocationSize;
    int lastIndex;

public:
    FastStack(int stackSize);
    FastStack();
    ~FastStack();

    inline void resize(int newSize);
    inline void push(T x);
    inline void pop();
    inline T getAndRemove();
    inline T getLast();
    inline void clear();
};

template <class T>
FastStack<T>::FastStack()
{
    lastIndex = -1;
    st = NULL;
}

template <class T>
FastStack<T>::FastStack(int stackSize)
{
    st = NULL;
    this->allocationSize = stackSize;
    st = new T[stackSize];
    lastIndex = -1;
}

template <class T>
FastStack<T>::~FastStack()
{
    delete [] st;
}

template <class T>
void FastStack<T>::clear()
{
    lastIndex = -1;
}

template <class T>
T FastStack<T>::getLast()
{
    return st[lastIndex];
}

template <class T>
T FastStack<T>::getAndRemove()
{
    return st[lastIndex--];
}

template <class T>
void FastStack<T>::pop()
{
    --lastIndex;
}

template <class T>
void FastStack<T>::push(T x)
{
    st[++lastIndex] = x;
}

template <class T>
void FastStack<T>::resize(int newSize)
{
    if (st != NULL)
        delete [] st;
    st = new T[newSize];
}

.
I run this simple benchmark for deque:

std::deque<int> aStack;
int x;

HRTimer timer;
timer.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < 2000000000; i++)
{
    aStack.push_back(i);
    x = aStack.back();
    if (i % 100 == 0 && i != 0)
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            aStack.pop_back();
}

double totalTime = timer.Stop();
stringstream ss;
ss << "std::deque " << totalTime;
log(ss.str());

.
Using std stack with vector as container (as 'Michael Kohne' suggested)

std::stack<int, std::vector<int>> bStack;
int x;

HRTimer timer;
timer.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < 2000000000; i++)
{
    bStack.push(i);
    x = bStack.top();
    if (i % 100 == 0 && i != 0)
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            bStack.pop();
}

double totalTime = timer.Stop();
stringstream ss;
ss << "std::stack " << totalTime;
log(ss.str());

.
And the same one for my FastStack:

FastStack<int> fstack(200);
int x;

HRTimer timer;
timer.Start();

for (int i = 0; i < 2000000000; i++)
{
    fstack.push(i);
    x = fstack.getLast();
    if (i % 100 == 0 && i != 0)
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            fstack.pop();
}

double totalTime = timer.Stop();
stringstream ss;
ss << "FastStack " << totalTime;
log(ss.str());

.
The results after 4 runs are as follows:
deque 15.529
deque 15.3756
deque 15.429
deque 15.4778

stack 6.19099
stack 6.1834
stack 6.19315
stack 6.19841

FastStack 3.01085
FastStack 2.9934
FastStack 3.02536
FastStack 3.00937

The results are in seconds and I was running the code on Intel i5 3570k (on default clock). I used VS2010 compiler with all optimizations that are available. I know that my FastStack has a lot of limitations but there are plenty situations, where it could be used and when it can give nice boost! (I used it in one project where I get 2x speed up comparing to std::queue).
So now my question is:
Are there any other "inhibitors" in C++ that everybody use but no one knows about them?
EDIT: I don't want to be offensive, I'm just curious if you know some unknown "speedups" like this.

share|improve this question
2  
After you build the deque, call resize on it. See if it makes a big speed difference. My guess is that a large portion of the speed gained/lost is from the deque class trying to "smartly" manage memory by changing size. –  Mr. Llama Oct 2 '12 at 15:23
1  
If "no one knows about them" how are they to be reported here? –  Eric Reichert Oct 2 '12 at 15:23
6  
I'll pretend I didn't see your last sentence and treat this as a legitimate performance question. –  Mysticial Oct 2 '12 at 15:23
9  
Your "stack" doesn't offer random access or fast insertion at both ends. How is this a sensible comparison? I'm sure your Toyota requires less fuel than my tank, but also it doesn't have a big cannon. –  Kerrek SB Oct 2 '12 at 15:25
2  
std::deque is designed for constant time insertion at both ends. A fairer comparison would be to extend your stack class (granted, it wouldn't be a stack anymore) to allow for that. Or compare with std::vector. –  juanchopanza Oct 2 '12 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

You are comparing apples and oranges. The dequeue is DOUBLE-ENDED, which requires it to be quite a bit different internally than the simple stack you've implemented. Try running your benchmark against an std::stack<int, std::vector<int> > instead and see how you do. std::stack is a container adapter, and if you use a vector as the underlying container, it should be nearly as fast as your home-grown implementation.

The one down side is that the std::stack implementation doesn't have a way for you to pre-set the size, so in situations where you KNOW what the max size needs to be, it'll be a little slower initially as it has to re-allocate several times. After that, it will be pretty much the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Same benchmark using vector as container for stack: 6.19099 6.1834 6.19315 6.19841. The benchmark puts only 100 numbers in stack in same time so reallocation shouldn't be so big problem. –  klerik Oct 2 '12 at 16:00
    
So do one iteration with std::stack (to set the size) and then do the timed loop (using the same pre-grown stack). How does it look now? –  Useless Oct 2 '12 at 16:14
    
Ok so I did one loop and add 100 numbers, then another loop and delete them (just before line 'HRTimer timer'). Using debugger I check stack capacity after these loops and it was 141 and remains 141 all the time (because only 100 elements are added in same time) and the results are worse - 6.65823. I did some experiments so i change loops to go up to 1000 and then results was 6.34 and then I changed it to 1000000 and results was 6.35 (capacity was 1049869). I don't know why result changing when changing unused capacity space (I mean the difference between 100 and 1000). –  klerik Oct 2 '12 at 16:44
    
I did one more experiment, I put Sleep(5000) right after the loops, now when loops go up to 100, results gets little better: 6.129 (average). –  klerik Oct 2 '12 at 16:56
    
I'd expect the std::stack to be slower than your implementation, remember that it's got to account for the possibility of extending the container at push_back time. Looking at your code again, I'm not too surprised that you are still much faster, because on we still aren't comparing apples to apples - your container doesn't have all the overhead needed to support auto-extending, or even the overhead of not running off into the adjacent memory block. So yes, your container SHOULD be faster, and if that's important to your application, great! Just don't screw up the sizing or you're toast. –  Michael Kohne Oct 4 '12 at 1:22

If you know the maximum amount of elements that will be in the stack at any given time you should use a std::vector on which you reserve the capacity upfront. Even if you don't know the capacity, for a stack you should use a std::vector which will grow a few times (higher cost than a preallocated vector when growing) but never shrink, so after some time it will stop allocating memory.

The issue with performance is that std::deque will allocate blocks as needed, and deallocate them when they are no longer needed (following some strategy), so if you fill and clear the std::deque often there will be allocations and deallocations continuously.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right. Performance gets better from 15 s to 6 s but it's still really slow when comparing with simple 'stack' class like the one I make. I know that my version has no error handling or other features but it's faster and also allows random access due to public members... –  klerik Oct 2 '12 at 17:11
1  
@klerik: What compiler and flags are you using? The only reason a std::vector would be slower than your handcrafted code is if you are using checked iterators, or compiling in debug mode with no function inlining. Performance testing is not trivial, you have to really understand what you are doing and the implications of the test or else you might not be able to interpret the results appropriately. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 2 '12 at 19:44
    
I was using VS2010, all benchmarks was running on Release build with parameters /O2, /Oi, /Ot, /Oy-, /GL and /Ob2, so any suitable function should be inline and all code optimizations should work. I was using debug only to find out stack capacity. But I was using checked iterators so I turned it off right now but looks like it make no difference at all. –  klerik Oct 2 '12 at 21:18
    
@klerik: Your implementation and a vector for which you preallocate with reserve are the same solution. There should not be any noticeable change in performance. I suggest you try to analyze where the performance impact is, as that is really unexpected. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 2 '12 at 21:38
    
I created new question, there are some results even from other users... link –  klerik Oct 3 '12 at 16:41

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