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What is the reason of having globals() function in Python? It only returns dictionary of global variables, which are already global, so they can be used anywhere... I'm asking only out of curiosity, trying to learn python.

def F():
    global x
    x = 1

def G():
    print(globals()["x"]) #will return value of global 'x', which is 1

def H():
    print(x) #will also return value of global 'x', which, also, is 1

F()
G()
H()

I can't really see the point here? Only time I would need it, was if I had local and global variables, with same name for both of them

def F():
    global x
    x = 1

def G():
    x = 5
    print(x) #5
    print(globals()["x"]) #1

F()
G()

But you should never run into a problem of having two variables with same name, and needing to use them both within same scope.

share|improve this question
    
"But you should never run into a problem of having two variables with same name, and needing to use them both within same scope." I can't follow this thought. That's the whole reason for separate namespaces, that you have variables with the same name in different scopes. When you work with two of them, duplicate names are a natural thing, but not a problem, as you can prefix them. –  Michael Oct 2 '12 at 15:45
    
Well I come from C++ family, so I'm not sure about Python people, but as far as I can think of, you shouldn't have a global variable that doesn't have an unique name. Sure there will be variables with same name, in same scope, that was stupid sentence from me, but not globals with same names as local ones. That's when I'd use namespaces for local ones... But don't know, if you say so. –  user1632861 Oct 2 '12 at 15:56
1  
@Mahi: globals is perhaps a little misleading. globals() is essentially the locals() of a module. The closest Python comes to globals that are truly global to all of your program is the __builtin__ module; anything you add to that module becomes available in all namespaces everywhere. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 2 '12 at 17:00
    
Hmm, good addition, not that I would need it right now, but maybe will some day... Thanks :) –  user1632861 Oct 3 '12 at 18:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Python gives the programmer a large number of tools for introspecting the running environment. globals() is just one of those, and it can be very useful in a debugging session to see what objects the global scope actually contains.

The rationale behind it, I'm sure, is the same as that of using locals() to see the variables defined in a function, or using dir to see the contents of a module, or the attributes of an object.

Coming from a C++ background, I can understand that these things seem unnecessary. In a statically linked, statically typed environment, they absolutely would be. In that case, it is known at compile time exactly what variables are global, and what members an object will have, and even what names are exported by another compilation unit.

In a dynamic language, however, these things are not fixed; they can change depending on how code is imported, or even during run time. For that reason at least, having access to this sort of information in a debugger can be invaluable.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1. Also, the dictionary returned by globals can be modified (probably a capability best left to experts). Also relevant is this quote from Dive Into Python "Using the locals and globals functions, you can get the value of arbitrary variables dynamically, providing the variable name as a string. This mirrors the functionality of the getattr function, which allows you to access arbitrary functions dynamically by providing the function name as a string." –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 2 '12 at 16:19
    
Not saying your answer was any better than other's, but for me it was. Thanks, I guess I need to calm down and remember that Python is not C++ :) And thanks for everyone else answering too, cleared quite alot. –  user1632861 Oct 2 '12 at 16:34

It's also useful when you need to call a function using function's string name. For example:

def foo():
    pass

function_name_as_string = 'foo'

globals()[function_name_as_string]() # foo(). 
share|improve this answer

You can pass the result to globals() and locals() to the eval, execfile and __import__ commands. Doing so creates a restricted environment for those commands to work in.

Thus, these functions exist to support other functions that benefit from being given an environment potentially different from the current context. You could, for example, call globals() then remove or add some variables before calling one of those functions.

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globals() is useful for eval() -- if you want to evaluate some code that refers to variables in scope, those variables will either be in globals or locals.


To expand a bit, the eval() builtin function will interpret a string of Python code given to it. The signature is: eval(codeString, globals, locals), and you would use it like so:

def foo():
    x = 2
    y = eval("x + 1", globals(), locals())
    print("y=" + y) # should be 3

This works, because the interpreter gets the value of x from the locals() dict of variables. You can of course supply your own dict of variables to eval.

share|improve this answer
1  
Downvoter: please explain in a comment. –  Richard Close Oct 2 '12 at 15:52
    
I wasn't the one downvoting, but that didn't really make sense, could you give an example code for easier understanding? –  user1632861 Oct 2 '12 at 15:59
    
Sure, I've expanded my answer. –  Richard Close Oct 2 '12 at 16:11
1  
Kinda weird and seems useless for me, but maybe that's just cause I'm new to Python :P Thanks anyways –  user1632861 Oct 2 '12 at 16:35

Well, I can give you the one and only example where I ever used globals(). It's a snippet from an IRC bot, which exposes full access to it's internals on command. I had to use globals() here, as locals() didn't make use of the module-wide imports, and I didn't want to import them again everytime to locals(). It's an extension to geventirc by the way.

class Execute(BotCmd):
    raw_mode = True
    level = 0
    aliases = 'exec',

    def __call__(self, client, nick, params):
        """ Create an execution environment and pass it to exec """
        mon = client.monitor # The main container for the program
        cmd = ' '.join(params[1:])

        def print(x):
            """ Overwrite print, so that it returns to the chat """
            client.msg(nick, str(x))

        def clear():
            """ Give the user a method to clear mess in his env """
            client.authenticated_users[nick].env.clear()

        client.authenticated_users[nick].env.update(locals())
        self.exec_cmd(client, nick, cmd)

    def exec_cmd(self, client, nick, cmd):
        try:
            exec(cmd, globals(), client.authenticated_users[nick].env)
#            exec cmd in client.authenticated_users[nick].env
        except gevent.GreenletExit: 
            pass
        except Exception as e:
            tb = traceback.format_exc() or str(e)
            client.msg(nick, tb)
        else:
            client.msg(nick, 'done')


class Print(Execute):
    """Evaluates a command and prints the result directly back to IRC. Variables
    from previous Execute commands and all objects mentioned in Execute are also
    available for Print commands.
    Syntax: Print <command>
    See also: Execute
    """
    aliases = 'echo',
    def exec_cmd(self, client, nick, cmd):
        try:
            ret = str(eval(cmd, globals(), client.authenticated_users[nick].env))
        except gevent.GreenletExit: 
            pass
        except Exception as e:
            tb = traceback.format_exc() or str(e)
            client.msg(nick, tb)
        else:
            client.msg(nick, ret)
share|improve this answer

Things I could think of:

  • globals can be used to check what global variable you have available.
  • it can be used to check if a variable is global
  • if you have the name of the variable as a variable itself, it might be useful
share|improve this answer
    
"It can be used to check if a variable is global", makes sense, but rest were kinda "nah", even tho they are true... –  user1632861 Oct 2 '12 at 15:58
    
Yes I guess That is true. I personally never use it –  Dean Elbaz Oct 2 '12 at 16:03

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