Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a sequential section within my kernel that is really slowing it down. However, I don't see how I could get rid of the inner loop. Any suggestions here?

__global__ void myKernel( int keep, int inc, int width, int* d_Xnum,
 int* d_Xco, bool* d_Xvalid,int* d_A )
{
  int i = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
  int j = blockIdx.y * blockDim.y + threadIdx.y;

  int k1;

  if( i < keep && j <= i){
    int counter = 0;

    for(k1 = 0; k1 < inc; k1++){
      if(d_Xvalid[j*inc + k1] == 0)
         counter += (d_Xvalid[i*inc + d_Xco[j*width + k1]]);
    }

    d_A[i*keep+j] = inc - d_Xnum[i] - counter;
  }
}

I believe that eliminating k1 will speed up my code by a good factor. However I don't see how to do it with counter being used. Any suggestions, ideas, thoughts would be more than welcome! This kernel is called:

         ...
  int t = 32;
  int b = keep/(32)+1;
  int b2 = (inc/32)+1;
  dim3 thread (t, t);
  dim3 block (b, inc);

  // kernel call
  myKernel<<<block, thread>>>(k, inc, width, d_Xnum,
                  d_Xco, d_Xvalid, d_A);
  cudaThreadSynchronize();
            ...

keep is around 9000 and inc around 20000

share|improve this question
2  
Could you perhaps explain what this code is actually suppose to be doing because it really is pretty obscure as written. Also would be good if you fix the syntax errors. –  talonmies Oct 2 '12 at 16:55
1  
The short answer is to maybe use a parallel reduction. But the triangular structure of the if statement may make this difficult. Plus, you may have plenty of parallelism without parallelizing the counter sum (hard to say without knowing your block and grid dimensions, and GPU model), which means it would not give you any speedup. So to echo @talonmies, it's pretty hard to answer this question without more information. –  harrism Oct 3 '12 at 0:00
    
It won't be easy to understand what the code is doing. Its very complex.I was looking for some kind of hint that would help me to speed up this piece of code, but I think it won't be easy without changing lots of sections of the entire code. –  Manolete Oct 3 '12 at 8:54
    
@Manolete: How can you seriously expect optimisation tips on a piece of code when you can't or won't explain what it is supposed be doing. It is clear from recent questions that you have a fairly limited understanding of the CUDA programming model, and with that as a background, it isn't obvious what features of that kernel are the real design pattern and what might be unnecessary or errors on your behalf. This could have been a good and useful stack overflow question, but it didn't turn out that way. –  talonmies Oct 4 '12 at 5:29
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not an exact answer to your question, but it's something that probably can optimize your code and maybe help you to implement a parallel reduction for k1 sum because you get rid of if( i < keep && j <= i). There are other optimizations you could implement depending on your gpu model, like using textures to access those read-only vectors.

Because of the way you generate the indices many threads are stopped waiting for the others to finish. You are launching keep*inc threads but only a maximum number of keep*(keep+1)/2 are actually doing something (because of the condition j <= i).

I think you can make it better with the following changes:

  1. launch keep*(keep+1)/2 threads

  2. do the following to your code

    __global__ void myKernel( int keep, int inc, int width, int* d_Xnum,
    int* d_Xco, bool* d_Xvalid,int* d_A )
    {
      int k = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
      int i = (int)(sqrt(0.25+2.0*k)-0.5); 
      int j = k - i*(i+1)/2;
    
      int k1;
      if( i < keep && j < inc){
        int counter = 0;
    
        for(k1 = 0; k1 < inc; k1++){
          if(d_Xvalid[j*inc + k1] == 0)
             counter += (d_Xvalid[i*inc + d_Xco[j*width + k1]]);
        }
    
        d_A[i*keep+j] = inc - d_Xnum[i] - counter;
      }
    }
    

What you're doing (for keep = 4 launch 4*4 = 16 threads, in the best case scenario. If inc > keep, as it seems to be the case, you're launching even more threads) can be seen as (each 'box' is a thread)

_________________________________
| i = 0 | i = 0 | i = 0 | i = 0 |
| j = 0 |   -   |   -   |   -   |
_________________________________
| i = 1 | i = 1 | i = 1 | i = 1 |
| j = 0 | j = 1 |   -   |   -   |
_________________________________
| i = 2 | i = 2 | i = 2 | i = 2 |
| j = 0 | j = 1 | j = 2 |   -   |
_________________________________
| i = 3 | i = 3 | i = 3 | i = 3 |
| j = 0 | j = 1 | j = 2 | j = 3 |
_________________________________

I propose you add an index k and generate i and j from it according to your needs (for keep = 4 launch (4*(4+1)/2 = 10 threads)

_________________________________________________________________________________
| k = 0 | k = 0 | k = 1 | k = 0 | k = 1 | k = 2 | k = 0 | k = 1 | k = 2 | k = 3 |
| i = 0 | i = 1 | i = 1 | i = 2 | i = 2 | i = 2 | i = 3 | i = 3 | i = 3 | i = 3 |
| j = 0 | j = 0 | j = 1 | j = 0 | j = 1 | j = 2 | j = 0 | j = 1 | j = 2 | j = 3 |
_________________________________________________________________________________

this can be done with

  • i = (int)(sqrt(0.25+2*k)-0.5)

  • j = k - i*(i+1)/2

You can accept this as a recipe or look a little bit on the mathematics behind it.

To get here you know that for j = 0 you have i*(i+1)/2 = k (because k = 0+1+2+...+i = i*(i+1)/2 ). Now, if you solve this equation you get the equation for i (the cast for int rounds down and ensures that it gets the right result when j!=0 too). To get j you should subtract to k the value it would have if j was 0: i*(i+1)/2.

share|improve this answer
    
@ JeanMoniuc: awesome reply! Let me try if it works and if it speeds up a bit. Thanks! –  Manolete Oct 3 '12 at 9:02
    
@ JeanMoniuc :it really speeds up the code, but unfortunately it doesn't work. I am doing something wrong here. I am launching the kernel with :myKernel<<<((keep*(keep+1)/2)/128)+1, 128>>>(...) –  Manolete Oct 3 '12 at 9:19
    
Done! It is very clever mathematically speaking, but I don't understand why launching more threads it slows than the code... –  Manolete Oct 3 '12 at 13:32
    
@Manolete: Is it already working? The threads are sent to gpu in warps (currently each warp has 32 threads). When you have threads that aren't doing anything they still have to wait that for the threads in their warp to finish, occupying the place of threads that could be calculating what you want. Most of the times (though not always) many inactive threads mean slower code –  andreamado Oct 3 '12 at 15:42
    
@ JeanMoniuc: It works, but from time to time it gives the wrong result. Are we missing something here? I have debug it for small numbers and it works okay, but I don't see why it fails randomly... –  Manolete Oct 5 '12 at 9:43
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.