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I am trying to implement a soft delete feature in my project by overriding the DbContext.SaveChanges() method and undoing the deletion of any entities which implement my ISoftDelete interface.

interface ISoftDelete
{
  bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
}

In the SaveChanges() method I am calling my SoftDelete() method for every entry that is in the 'deleted' state and implements ISoftDelete.:

var entries = this.ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => (x.State == EntityState.Deleted) && x.Entity is ISoftDelete)
                    .ToList();
                entries.ForEach(SoftDelete);

My SoftDelete() method is as follows:

private void SoftDelete(DbEntityEntry entry)
{
    if (entry.State == EntityState.Deleted && entry.Entity is ISoftDelete)
    {
        entry.Reload();
        var entity = (ISoftDelete)entry.Entity;
        entity.IsDeleted = true;
        entry.State = EntityState.Modified;
    }
}

This will work perfectly until I run into an entity which has a one to one association to something else. At which point, an exception is thrown with this error:

{"A relationship from the 'ChildParent' AssociationSet is in the 'Deleted' state. Given multiplicity constraints, a corresponding 'Parent' must also in the 'Deleted' state."}

Is there a way to get all the associations for that entity and change the deleted state for them as well?

I've already tried getting the reference to the actual associated entity but the entity's EntityState is set to Unchanged instead of Deleted.

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3  
I think the association itself is being marked as deleted (associations are treated as separate objects in EF) but not the related entity. Now when EF tries to remove the association it cannot because the related entity is not marked for deleted. I assume that the foreign key is not nullable and therefore removing an entity requires removing the related entity (cascade delete). You can check this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/10300156/…. It may be helpful as it shows how to get to related objects. –  Pawel Oct 2 '12 at 22:28
    
It was helpful in getting the related objects, thank you. However, when trying to change the state of one of the relationships, I get a weird error that says "Cannot change state of a relationship if one of the ends of the relationship is a KeyEntry." –  Jonathan Oct 9 '12 at 15:57
    
Have you looked at this workaround? –  Mark M Oct 12 '12 at 2:12

2 Answers 2

You are calling Reload first, at this time state is deleted so it will not reload, you should change state first and then try to reload.

private void SoftDelete(DbEntityEntry entry)
{
    if (entry.State == EntityState.Deleted && entry.Entity is ISoftDelete)
    {
        var entity = (ISoftDelete)entry.Entity;
        entity.IsDeleted = true;
        entry.State = EntityState.Modified;
        entry.Reload();
    }
}
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In general, you need to soft delete the childs in the Parent-Child relationships first. Start with the topmost parent, and recurse your way through the children. Mark every item visited, so that you can track if it has already been soft deleted (in case of back references).

If you have a "business object" concept, you can add Childs and Parent properties for ease of navigation. Otherwise you'll have to "hand-code" this on each Parent with non trivial child relations.

Also notice that using one LINQ statement you have no control over the actual traversing.

I know the above seems like a lot of work, but consider how you would device a mechanism in EF that would automatically infer the needed relationship information?! You would properly end up doing stuff like this.

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