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I have a collection full of documents with a created_date attribute. I'd like to send these documents through an aggregation pipeline to do some work on them. Ideally I would like to filter them using a $match before I do any other work on them so that I can take advantage of indexes however I can't figure out how to use the new $year/$month/$dayOfMonth operators in my $match expression.

There are a few examples floating around of how to use the operators in a $project operation but I'm concerned that by placing a $project as the first step in my pipeline then I've lost access to my indexes (MongoDB documentation indicates that the first expression must be a $match to take advantage of indexes).

Sample data:

{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 1',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-09-29T05:23:41Z')
    comments: 48
}
{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 2',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-09-24T12:34:13Z')
    comments: 10
}
{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 3',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-08-16T12:34:13Z')
    comments: 10
}

I'd like to run this through an aggregation pipeline to get the total comments on all posts made in September

{
    aggregate: 'posts',
    pipeline: [
         {$match:
             /*Can I use the $year/$month operators here to match Sept 2012?
             $year:created_date : 2012,
             $month:created_date : 9
             */
             /*or does this have to be 
             created_date : 
                  {$gte:{$date:'2012-09-01T04:00:00Z'}, 
                  $lt: {$date:'2012-10-01T04:00:00Z'} }
             */
         },
         {$group:
             {_id: '0',
              totalComments:{$sum:'$comments'}
             }
          }
    ]
 }

This works but the match loses access to any indexes for more complicated queries:

{
    aggregate: 'posts',
    pipeline: [
         {$project:
              {
                   month : {$month:'$created_date'},
                   year : {$year:'$created_date'}
              }
         },
         {$match:
              {
                   month:9,
                   year: 2012
               }
         },
         {$group:
             {_id: '0',
              totalComments:{$sum:'$comments'}
             }
          }
    ]
 }
share|improve this question
    
what type of value do you want to match? can you give an example with actual date values? –  Asya Kamsky Oct 2 '12 at 16:51
    
Can you post some sample data and sample output? –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 16:52
    
Have added some sample data and an example of what I'm trying to do –  Mason Oct 2 '12 at 17:15
    
Are those strings or dates? You won't be able to perform date queries on them if they're strings. –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 17:19
1  
Do you need to group by month and year for some reason? If so, I would $project AFTER the $match, but using the $match as per my original code sample. You can always $match again on month and year. Otherwise, you're not indexing month and year, just date. One alternative, is to store the date in two formats. Why not store a duplicate month and year field that you can index directly if that's the way you need to query? I'm still not clear on why you want to filter on month and date fields at all though. The date query you already have works pretty well to find posts in September. –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you already found, you cannot $match on fields that are not in the document (it works exactly the same way that find works) and if you use $project first then you will lose the ability to use indexes.

What you can do instead is combine your efforts as follows:

{
    aggregate: 'posts',
    pipeline: [
         {$match: {
             created_date : 
                  {$gte:{$date:'2012-09-01T04:00:00Z'}, 
                  $lt:  {date:'2012-10-01T04:00:00Z'} 
                  }}
             }
         },
         {$group:
             {_id: '0',
              totalComments:{$sum:'$comments'}
             }
          }
    ]
 }

The above only gives you aggregation for September, if you wanted to aggregate for multiple months, you can for example:

{
    aggregate: 'posts',
    pipeline: [
         {$match: {
             created_date : 
                  { $gte:'2012-07-01T04:00:00Z', 
                    $lt: '2012-10-01T04:00:00Z'
                  }
         },
         {$project: {
              comments: 1,
              new_created: {
                        "yr" : {"$year" : "$created_date"},
                        "mo" : {"$month" : "$created_date"}
                     }
              }
         },
         {$group:
             {_id: "$new_created",
              totalComments:{$sum:'$comments'}
             }
          }
    ]
 }

and you'll get back something like:

{
    "result" : [
        {
            "_id" : {
                "yr" : 2012,
                "mo" : 7
            },
            "totalComments" : 5
        },
        {
            "_id" : {
                "yr" : 2012,
                "mo" : 8
            },
            "totalComments" : 19
        },
        {
            "_id" : {
                "yr" : 2012,
                "mo" : 9
            },
            "totalComments" : 21
        }
    ],
    "ok" : 1
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly! He didn't say so in the question, but that's the only reason I can imagine you'd need month and year in the pipeline. –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 18:09
    
"you cannot $match on fields that are not in the document" that answers my question, thanks –  Mason Oct 2 '12 at 18:22
    
Actually, you can if they're in the pipeline, like year and month are. What you can't do is use an index on them, since there won't be one. –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 22:33
    
@cirrus it's semantics at that point :) once you $project them, they are in the document so you can $match them in the next step, but of course, you are right - the benefit of index is gone by then... I also agree with your proposal to store month (and year) separately if it's going to help a lot to do this sort of aggregation. –  Asya Kamsky Oct 2 '12 at 22:49
    
The dates should be wrapped in ISODate(..) or? –  Christian Schneider Apr 25 at 13:37

Try this;

db.createCollection("so");
db.so.remove();
db.so.insert([
{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 1',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-09-29T05:23:41Z'),
    comments: 48
},
{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 2',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-09-24T12:34:13Z'),
    comments: 10
},
{
    post_body: 'This is the body of test post 3',
    created_date: ISODate('2012-08-16T12:34:13Z'),
    comments: 10
}
]);
//db.so.find();

db.so.ensureIndex({"created_date":1});
db.runCommand({
    aggregate:"so",
    pipeline:[
        {
            $match: { // filter only those posts in september
                created_date: { $gte: ISODate('2012-09-01'), $lt: ISODate('2012-10-01') }
            }
        },
        {
            $group: {
                _id: null, // no shared key
                comments: { $sum: "$comments" } // total comments for all the posts in the pipeline
            }
        },
]
//,explain:true
});

Result is;

{ "result" : [ { "_id" : null, "comments" : 58 } ], "ok" : 1 }

So you could also modify your previous example to do this, although I'm not sure why you'd want to, unless you plan on doing something else with month and year in the pipeline;

{
    aggregate: 'posts',
    pipeline: [
     {$match: { created_date: { $gte: ISODate('2012-09-01'), $lt: ISODate('2012-10-01') } } },
     {$project:
          {
               month : {$month:'$created_date'},
               year : {$year:'$created_date'}
          }
     },
     {$match:
          {
               month:9,
               year: 2012
           }
     },
     {$group:
         {_id: '0',
          totalComments:{$sum:'$comments'}
         }
      }
    ]
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm running this through the Java runCommand which is why I'm using $date instead of ISODate. But using the $gte and $lt operators is exactly what I posted in my original post if you look at my example. I'm asking about an alternative. –  Mason Oct 2 '12 at 17:31
    
Sorry, I didn't look at your second code sample before I posted. I thought you were concerned about the order of the $match statement. What's your concern over the match statement as it stands? It will use an index on created_date. Moreover, I'm not sure what you're trying to achieve with $project, but if you put that before a match, then it won't be healthy. –  cirrus Oct 2 '12 at 17:48

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