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I have created this parent class

class DBMysqli {
    private $mysqli;

    function __construct($Mysqli) {
        $this->mysqli = $Mysqli;
    }


     public function GET($queryArr){

        $query = "SELECT ";

       ...

        $result = $this->mysqli->query($query); //Here I get a run time error!!
        echo $this->mysqli->error;

        return $result;
   }
}

and a child class

class FolderComment extends DBMysqli{

    protected $data;


    public function __construct() {
        $this->mysqli = DB::Simulator(); //works, initiliaze $mysqli
        $table = array(
            'tables' => 'folder_comments',
            'conditions' => '1'
        );

        $this->data = $this->GET($table);
    }

}

I get run time error, stating that the $this->mysqli is null. but I have set it in the child class. I guess this is an OOP understating question..

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change

private $mysqli;

To

protected $mysqli;

In the prent class

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THANKS, that was easy... –  devmonster Oct 2 '12 at 16:51
    
You're quite welcome! –  lix Oct 2 '12 at 16:55

I believe that since you have made mysqli a private variable, it is not getting set in the child's constructor as you presume. It should be protected if you want children to be able to access it.

So instead what is happening is that you are creating a new variable in your child class called mysqli, since it never inherited the private field from the parent in the first place.

Your other option would be to call the parent's constructor implicitly and send it the mysqli variable.

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You need to pass on mysqli object to your parent class

   public function __construct() {
        parent::__construct(DB::Simulator());
        $table = array(
            'tables' => 'folder_comments',
            'conditions' => '1'
        );

        $this->data = $this->GET($table);
    }
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+1 I would go with this solution, although everyone is correct. IMO $mysqli is part of the encapsulated implementation of DMmysqli and should be private, I think this was the intention and not the mistake. Setup of this dependency was provided in the DMmysqli constructor so the existing contract should be obeyed by calling the parent constructor. In PHP parent constructors are not called implicitly so you must call the parent yourself. –  Gavin Oct 2 '12 at 16:55
    
@Gavin thanks.Agree with you –  GBD Oct 2 '12 at 16:58
    
That's a whole architecture change, while perhaps a valid point (dependency injection is a great thing) it further means he should not be using inheritance at all... instead of $this->get it should be $this->db->get, and why make the mistake of constructing inside the child class when you could just pass in the connection as with the parent? –  Rudu Oct 2 '12 at 17:40
    
@Rudu I agree in principle, I think I saw some signs of an attempt at encapsulation though, so I saw this solution as the direction devmonster was aiming for. Likely not really wanting to raise the bar to full on DIP, rather just a nudge in the right direction. –  Gavin Oct 2 '12 at 18:23

In DBMysqli you need $mysqli to be protected, not private

class DBMysqli {
    protected $mysqli;
    //...

Private says that any access - either external or inherited is prevented, while protected says external access is prevented but inherited objects can access the property.

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