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I have code that sets a default value of a cell to the value of the cell above multiplied by 100:

const int DUCKBILL_MULTIPLIER = 100;
. . .
cellValue = dataGridViewPlatypi.Rows[args.RowIndex - 1].Cells[0].Value;
if (Convert.ToInt32(cellValue) > 0)
{
    int nextDefaultVal = Convert.ToInt32(cellValue) * DUCKBILL_MULTIPLIER;
    cellValue = nextDefaultVal;
}
prevVal = cellValue == null ? string.Empty : cellValue.ToString();
. . .
dataGridViewPlatypi.Rows[args.RowIndex].Cells[args.ColumnIndex].Value = prevVal;

But once the value above gets to be 1000000000 (1 billion), the next value is 1215752192 (1,215,752,192 or approximately 1.2 billion) instead of 100 billion.

I understand that the max int value is 2,147,483,647 (approximately 2.1 billion); so why is the next value 1,215,752,192 instead of 2,147,483,647?

BTW, these vals are larger than the app will ever need to be, but I found this in testing "extreme" cases.

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10  
Integer Overflow... Integers don't saturate. They roll-over. –  Mysticial Oct 2 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Because multiple overflows are happening. Every time 2,147,483,647 is reached, the count starts over. Now, you have to keep in mind that it overflows to -2,147,483,648. So we have to take into account the whole Int32 range, which is 4,294,967,296 (it can be calculated from (Int64)Int32.MaxValue + 1 - Int32.MinValue or simply 2^32.

The math:

(1 billion * 100) % (4,294,967,296) = 1215752192

Proof of concept in C# code:

var range = (Int64)Int32.MaxValue + 1 - Int32.MinValue;
Int64 val = 100000000000 % range;
Console.WriteLine(range);
Console.WriteLine(val);
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You mean % 2,147,483,648, because (1 billion * 100) % 2147483648 is 1215752192, which is the value reported in the question. –  phoog Oct 2 '12 at 17:05
    
@phoog Well noted, just updated the answer –  Adrian Carneiro Oct 2 '12 at 17:15
1  
When the number overflows it will overflow to -2,147,483,648, not 0. You need to take the mod of 4294967296 (2^32), which still gives the same answer in this case. –  Servy Oct 2 '12 at 17:50
    
@Servy You are right, I just updated the answer to be more accurate –  Adrian Carneiro Oct 2 '12 at 17:57
    
@Adrian You could just get the value from uint.MaxValue –  Servy Oct 2 '12 at 18:01

(1,000,000,000 * 100) mod ((2,147,483,647 + 1) * 2) = 1,215,752,192

This is due to integer overflow.

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Great, but you don't explain why this happens. –  Second Rikudo Oct 2 '12 at 16:56
1  
You mean "mod 2147483648": (1000000000 * 100) mod 2147483648 = 1215752192, which is the value reported in the question. –  phoog Oct 2 '12 at 17:05
    
You are correct @phoog, thank you. –  jshrake Oct 2 '12 at 17:18
2  
When the number overflows it will overflow to -2,147,483,648, not 0. You need to take the mod of 4294967296 (2^32), which still gives the same answer in this case. –  Servy Oct 2 '12 at 17:50
    
@Servy +1; very good point. –  phoog Oct 2 '12 at 20:22

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