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I'm having a difficulty in converting a value to LPWSTR. I'm getting a registry value, and trying to return the result as LPWSTR. It appears the registry call using RegQueryValueExW works with a variety of types going in to store the result, but I can't cast any of them back to LPWSTR.

LPWSTR value;
HKEY hKey;

long result = RegOpenKeyExW(HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, L"RegEntry1", 0, ACCESS|KEY_WOW64_32KEY, &hKey); 
if (result == ERROR_SUCCESS)
{
   //WCHAR buffer[512];
   //TCHAR buffer[512];
   LPWSTR buffer[512];
   DWORD bufferSize = sizeof(buffer); 
   ULONG queryVal = 0; 

   queryVal = RegQueryValueExW(hKey, L"Path", 0, NULL, (LPBYTE)buffer, &bufferSize); 
   if (queryVal == ERROR_SUCCESS)
   { 
      //Access violation error here; I need some type of conversion.
      value = buffer;
   }
}

No posts that I've read on here so far have led me to an answer. C++ is not my primary dev language.

UPDATE: None of the proposed answers worked for me. I found an alternative way to do what I needed.

share|improve this question
2  
Your buffer is 512 strings (not even as they don't have any allocated memory; you're just overwriting pointer values). – chris Oct 2 '12 at 17:22
1  
In your question you say you can't cast (which would be at compile time) ... but in your comment you say you get an Access Violation (which would be at run time). Which is it? – dajames Oct 2 '12 at 17:42
    
I can compile if I use WCHAR, but that's when I get the Access Violation. I can't compile with the other two (unless I comment out the "value = buffer" line). – Random Oct 2 '12 at 17:45

Your buffer variable is declaring an array of 512 wchar_t* pointers when it should be declaring an array of 512 wchar_t characters instead. The first commented-out line of code is the correct code to use:

WCHAR buffer[512]; 
DWORD bufferSize = sizeof(buffer);  

ULONG queryVal = RegQueryValueExW(hKey, L"Path", 0, NULL, (LPBYTE)buffer, &bufferSize);  
if (queryVal == ERROR_SUCCESS) 
{  
    //...
} 

Keep in mind that the buffer will not be null-terminated if the Registry value was not stored with its own null-terminator, so you should allocate some extra space for your own null terminator, just in case:

WCHAR buffer[512+1]; 
DWORD bufferSize = (sizeof(buffer) - sizeof(WCHAR));  

LONG queryVal = RegQueryValueExW(hKey, L"Path", 0, NULL, (LPBYTE)buffer, &bufferSize);  
if (queryVal == ERROR_SUCCESS) 
{  
    buffer[bufferSize / sizeof(WCHAR)] = 0;
    //...
} 

Alternatively, use RegGetValue() instead, which handles the null terminator for you:

WCHAR buffer[512+1];
DWORD bufferSize = sizeof(buffer);  

LONG queryVal = RegGetValueW(hKey, NULL, L"Path", RRF_RT_REG_SZ | RRF_RT_REG_EXPAND_SZ, NULL, buffer, &bufferSize);
if (queryVal == ERROR_SUCCESS) 
{  
    //...
} 
share|improve this answer
    
It works in getting the registry value, but I still need to convert the value of buffer to LPWSTR. – Random Oct 2 '12 at 21:16
    
It is already in LPWSTR format by the fact that you are calling the Unicode version of RegQueryValueEx() or RegGetValue(). Simply pass your filled-in buffer to whatever is expecting an LPWSTR value. – Remy Lebeau Oct 3 '12 at 0:17
    
Continued testing, with the information gleaned from here, makes me think it may be the way I'm declaring the PInvoke incorrectly. Will post back when I have more info. – Random Oct 9 '12 at 19:08

You don't want a buffer of LPWSTR, you want a buffer of wchar_t. A pointer to that will be LPWSTR as it's a typedef for wchar_t *.

These two lines from WinNT.h are relevant:

typedef wchar_t WCHAR;    // wc,   16-bit UNICODE character

typedef __nullterminated WCHAR *NWPSTR, *LPWSTR, *PWSTR;

Edit: I suspect the problem is with the part of the code you haven't shown us. Are you returning value from a function? If so then the problem is that you're returning a pointer to a buffer that has gone out of scope and been destroyed. I would return a std::wstring or CString instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I started out using WCHAR as the buffer. Since I've been unable to solve the conversion to LPWSTR, I was just trying anything I could think of to get around the problem. – Random Oct 2 '12 at 21:19
    
LPWSTR is a pointer to a WCHAR. If you have an array of WCHAR values, the array can be assigned as-is to an LPWSTR and it will receive a pointer to the first WCHAR in the array. – Remy Lebeau Oct 3 '12 at 0:19
    
@Random check my edit. – Mark Ransom Oct 3 '12 at 2:19

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