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I'd like advice on a way to cache a computation that is shared by two derived classes. As an illustration, I have two types of normalized vectors L1 and L2, which each define their own normalization constant (note: against good practice I'm inheriting from std::vector here as a quick illustration-- believe it or not, my real problem is not about L1 and L2 vectors!):

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <math.h>

struct NormalizedVector : public std::vector<double> {
  NormalizedVector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    std::vector<double>(init_list) { }
  double get_value(int i) const {
    return (*this)[i] / get_normalization_constant();
  }
  virtual double get_normalization_constant() const = 0;
};

struct L1Vector : public NormalizedVector {
  L1Vector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    NormalizedVector(init_list) { }
  double get_normalization_constant() const {
    double tot = 0.0;
    for (int k=0; k<size(); ++k)
      tot += (*this)[k];
    return tot;
  }
};

struct L2Vector : public NormalizedVector {
  L2Vector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    NormalizedVector(init_list) { }
  double get_normalization_constant() const {
    double tot = 0.0;
    for (int k=0; k<size(); ++k) {
      double val = (*this)[k];
      tot += val * val;
    }
    return sqrt(tot);
  }
};

int main() {
  L1Vector vec{0.25, 0.5, 1.0};
  std::cout << "L1 ";
  for (int k=0; k<vec.size(); ++k)
    std::cout << vec.get_value(k) << " ";
  std::cout << std::endl;

  std::cout << "L2 ";
  L2Vector vec2{0.25, 0.5, 1.0};
  for (int k=0; k<vec2.size(); ++k)
    std::cout << vec2.get_value(k) << " ";
  std::cout << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

This code is unnecessarily slow for large vectors because it calls get_normalization_constant() repeatedly, even though it doesn't change after construction (assuming modifiers like push_back have appropriately been disabled).

If I was only considering one form of normalization, I would simply use a double value to cache this result on construction:

struct NormalizedVector : public std::vector<double> {
  NormalizedVector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    std::vector<double>(init_list) {
    normalization_constant = get_normalization_constant();
  }
  double get_value(int i) const {
    return (*this)[i] / normalization_constant;
  }

  virtual double get_normalization_constant() const = 0;
  double normalization_constant;
};

However, this understandably doesn't compile because the NormalizedVector constructor tries to call a pure virtual function (the derived virtual table is not available during base initialization).


Option 1: Derived classes must manually call the normalization_constant = get_normalization_constant(); function in their constructors.


Option 2: Objects define a virtual function for initializing the constant:

init_normalization_constant() {
  normalization_constant = get_normalization_constant();
}

Objects are then constructed by a factory:

struct NormalizedVector : public std::vector<double> {
  NormalizedVector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    std::vector<double>(init_list) {
    //    init_normalization_constant();
  }
  double get_value(int i) const {
    return (*this)[i] / normalization_constant;
  }

  virtual double get_normalization_constant() const = 0;
  virtual void init_normalization_constant() {
    normalization_constant = get_normalization_constant();
  }

  double normalization_constant;
};

// ...
// same code for derived types here
// ...

template <typename TYPE>
struct Factory {
  template <typename ...ARGTYPES>
  static TYPE construct_and_init(ARGTYPES...args) {
    TYPE result(args...);
    result.init_normalization_constant();
    return result;
  }
};

int main() {
  L1Vector vec = Factory<L1Vector>::construct_and_init<std::initializer_list<double> >({0.25, 0.5, 1.0});
  std::cout << "L1 ";
  for (int k=0; k<vec.size(); ++k)
    std::cout << vec.get_value(k) << " ";
  std::cout << std::endl;

  return 0;
}


Option 3: Use an actual cache: get_normalization_constant is defined as a new type, CacheFunctor; the first time CacheFunctor is called, it saves the return value.


In Python, this works as originally coded, because the virtual table is always present, even in __init__ of a base class. In C++ this is much trickier.

I'd really appreciate the help; this comes up a lot for me. I feel like I'm getting the hang of good object oriented design in C++, but not always when it comes to making very efficient code (especially in the case of this sort of simple caching).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suggest the non-virtual interface pattern. This pattern excels when you want a method to provide both common and unique functionality. (In this case, caching in common, computation in uniqueness.)

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/More_C%2B%2B_Idioms/Non-Virtual_Interface

// UNTESTED
struct NormalizedVector : public std::vector<double> {
 ...
  double normalization_constant;
  bool cached;
  virtual double do_get_normalization_constant() = 0;
  double get_normalization_constant() {
    if(!cached) {
      cached = true;
      normalization_constant = do_get_normalization_constant();
    }
    return normalization_constant;
};

P.s. You really ought not publicly derive from std::vector.

P.P.s. Invalidating the cache is as simple as setting cached to false.


Complete Solution

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <cmath>
#include <algorithm>

struct NormalizedVector : private std::vector<double> {
private:
  typedef std::vector<double> Base;
protected:
  using Base::operator[];
  using Base::begin;
  using Base::end;
public:
  using Base::size;

  NormalizedVector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    std::vector<double>(init_list) { }
  double get_value(int i) const {
    return (*this)[i] / get_normalization_constant();
  }

  virtual double do_get_normalization_constant() const = 0;
  mutable bool normalization_constant_valid;
  mutable double normalization_constant;
  double get_normalization_constant() const {
    if(!normalization_constant_valid) {
      normalization_constant = do_get_normalization_constant();
      normalization_constant_valid = true;
    }
    return normalization_constant;
  }

  void push_back(const double& value) {
    normalization_constant_valid = false;
    Base::push_back(value);
  }

  virtual ~NormalizedVector() {}
};

struct L1Vector : public NormalizedVector {
  L1Vector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    NormalizedVector(init_list) { get_normalization_constant(); }
  double do_get_normalization_constant() const {
    return std::accumulate(begin(), end(), 0.0);
  }
};

struct L2Vector : public NormalizedVector {
  L2Vector(std::initializer_list<double> init_list):
    NormalizedVector(init_list) { get_normalization_constant(); }
  double do_get_normalization_constant() const {
    return std::sqrt(
      std::accumulate(begin(), end(), 0.0,
        [](double a, double b) { return a + b * b; } ) );
  }
};

std::ostream&
operator<<(std::ostream& os, NormalizedVector& vec) {
  for (int k=0; k<vec.size(); ++k)
    os << vec.get_value(k) << " ";
  return os;
}

int main() {
  L1Vector vec{0.25, 0.5, 1.0};
  std::cout << "L1 " << vec << "\n";

  vec.push_back(2.0);
  std::cout << "L1 " << vec << "\n";

  L2Vector vec2{0.25, 0.5, 1.0};
  std::cout << "L2 " << vec2 << "\n";

  vec2.push_back(2.0);
  std::cout << "L2 " << vec2 << "\n";
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for no inheriting from vector. –  Yousf Oct 2 '12 at 17:39
    
+1 Thanks, good formalism of the caching strategy. Would you have a recommendation if it had to be performed in the constructor? –  Oliver Oct 2 '12 at 18:01
2  
@Oliver - you just can't do it in the base-class constructor. During the execution of the base-class constructor, the derived-class object doesn't exist yet. The best I can think of is that you could invoke get_normalization_constant() from the derived-class constructor to prime the cache. –  Robᵩ Oct 2 '12 at 18:10
    
@Oliver - See my most recent edit. –  Robᵩ Oct 2 '12 at 18:13

A quick and dirty solution is to use static member variable.

  double get_normalization_constant() const {
    static double tot = 0.0;
    if( tot == 0.0 )
    for (int k=0; k<size(); ++k)
      tot += (*this)[k];
    return tot;
  }

In this case, it will only be computed once.. and each time it will return the latest value.

NOTE: This double tot, will be shared will all objects of same type. Don't use it if you will create many object of the type L1Vector

share|improve this answer
    
I see what you mean, but would that work if I declared more than one vector of type L1Vector? –  Oliver Oct 2 '12 at 17:34
    
No, it is the same as static members variables. One copy per class, not per object. –  Yousf Oct 2 '12 at 17:38
    
But if I instantiate two objects in that class, won't they share the same normalization constant? –  Oliver Oct 2 '12 at 17:42

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