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I have an html page with +20 css file imports. How can I concatenate these into one css file and extract only the css rules relevant for the html page?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I can't think of a simple solution. But if you use jQuery, you could try the following code. It searches the CSS for every element in the DOM and outputs it. Just paste it into a <script type="text/javascript"></script> tag in your <head> section and make sure jQuery is included.

Only tested with Chrome and a simple test site but it should work with more complex stylesheets and DOM structures as well.

$(function(){
    var styles = new Array;
    $('body, body *').each(function(index, element){
        //Get all stylesheets
        var sheets = document.styleSheets;
        for(var i in sheets) {
            //For every stylesheet...
            var rules = sheets[i].rules || sheets[i].cssRules;
            for(var r in rules) {
                //Check or every rule if it matches the element & check if already appended
                if($(element).is(rules[r].selectorText) &&
                   $.inArray(rules[r].cssText,styles) == -1){
                    //Append CSS to array
                    styles.push(rules[r].cssText);
                }
            }
        }
    });
    //Output
    $('body').text(styles.join(''));
});
        ​
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Minify css @ gtmetrix.com –  Morten Oct 4 '12 at 6:24

This question does not solve the OP's problem. However, it is left here as reference for guests arriving from search engines.

Your approach is slightly flawed.

Allow me to redirect you to a great article by Chris Coyer @ CSS-Tricks: One Two or Three.

Here's the short version, according to this approach, each page should have a maximum of 3 CSS files:

  1. global.css - which contains site-level rules (body background, CSS reset, typography, etc).
  2. section.css - Which contains section level rules, by section I mean, Stack Overflow's main page would have a certain style, while all the FAQs share another, different file of FAQ specific rules.
  3. page.css - Which contains page level rules. If one needs a specific rules (for, let's say, an about page) for a certain page, they'd be put here.

The reason for that is, files that don't change, get cached. Meaning, the user will only download the CSS file once (assuming it doesn't change), and on future visits, the file will be loaded from the user's machine, saving valuable time and bandwidth.

If you serve one file, which is generated based on the page the user is viewing, you lose that caching ability. So while the file size will be lower, you'll need to download the file over and over again.

tl;dr

Make a global CSS file that would stay static, minify it and serve it. Then make a bunch of more specific CSS files to be served in different sections of your site/app. It doesn't happen much where you need that third page specific file.

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The html page was generated by my Drupal installation. My intention is to make the html page a stand-alone web page, independent of Drupal. Therefore I'm looking for a way to concatenate the multiple css files into a single css file. –  Morten Oct 2 '12 at 18:02
    
@Morten: In that case, my answer is not valid. I will leave it here as reference, but it is not a suitable solution to your problem. –  Second Rikudo Oct 2 '12 at 18:04

Create a blank CSS file. Copy all CSS into that file. Minify the new CSS file. Import the new CSS file and delete references to all of the other CSS files. Leave it to the browser to "extract only the css rules relevant for the html page".

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The point is to deliver as small of a file size as possible. So leaving it to the browser hardly seems like the best option. –  Second Rikudo Oct 2 '12 at 17:42
    
The OP wants to concatenate all of the files into one. My answer addresses his requirements. Of course the "best" case scenario is that the OP carves out all of the relevant CSS and jams it into one CSS file. That's not what the OP asked though. –  Lowkase Oct 2 '12 at 17:48

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