Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating the array like this in the header file:

double (*arrayName)[b][c];

And allocating it like this in the cpp file:

arrayName= new double[a][b][c];

Where a, b, and c are constants based on the size of the data I am dealing with.

How do I deallocate this array? I tried doing the suggestion in Deallocation of 3 dimensional array, but that gives me a "Warning C4154: deletion of an array expression; conversion to pointer supplied" and causes a heap corruption error.

I'd prefer to not change to vectors as I am working with legacy code that is being repurposed but needs to stay as similar to the original as possible. I've already had to change from using static allocation to new/delete, as with the scale of the data we are working with it was overflowing the stack.

Thanks!

Edit: WhozCraig's method appears to be correct. I thought the way I was deallocating this array (and others like it) was my problem, but I noticed another issue in my code. I think I've fixed that, and I'll report back once my program is done rerunning (will take a day or two at least). Thanks for everyone who responded.

Edit 2: Things still aren't working 100%, but the issues are outside the scope of this question and I was able to tweak some values to get things working well enough to get the job done. Thanks again for all who responded.

share|improve this question
3  
arrayName= new double[a][b][c]; compiles? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 2 '12 at 17:46
4  
Odds are extremely good that you're better off using std::vector rather than C-style arrays. And if you really insist on doing (de)allocation yourself, you're best off just using pointers, not arrays and pointers in combination. –  KRyan Oct 2 '12 at 17:49
1  
Yes, it compiles just fine! –  Oniofchaos Oct 2 '12 at 17:50
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/8579207/… see this answer for how to do it with std::vector –  pyCthon Oct 2 '12 at 17:52
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The vector-delete should work for this.

static const int b = 10;
static const int c = 10;
double (*arrayName)[b][c] = NULL;
arrayName = new double[10][b][c];
delete [] arrayName;

If you must allocate this dynamically and immediately like this, and want proof that destructors are fired correctly...

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class MyObj
{
public:
    MyObj() : val(1.0) {};
    ~MyObj() { cout << "~MyObj()" << endl;}

private:
    double val;
};

int main()
{
    static const int b = 3;
    static const int c = 3;
    MyObj (*arrayName)[b][c] = NULL;
    arrayName = new MyObj[3][b][c];
    delete [] arrayName;
    return 0;
}

will result in the following output (don't bother counting, there are 27 of them)

~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
~MyObj()
share|improve this answer
    
That is what I am doing. I was not 100% sure if it was correct because my program was running out of memory, so I figured that I may have been deallocating the multidimensional arrays wrong. Thanks for the verification! –  Oniofchaos Oct 2 '12 at 20:14
    
No problem. glad to help. –  WhozCraig Oct 2 '12 at 20:16
add comment

Do you really need to explicitly create it with new? Why not just create it in scope:

double arrayName[a][b][c];

It will be deallocated when it goes out of scope.

To avoid stack use:

class some_wrapper {
    double arrayName[a][b][c];
};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming it's because of the potential for a 3 dimensional array to become very large.. Although this is definitely a good choice if this is not the case. –  Benj Oct 2 '12 at 17:52
    
Because the amount of data that I am using is so large that it causes a stack overflow. That is how the program was originally. The original creator was using a smaller data set. –  Oniofchaos Oct 2 '12 at 17:52
    
@Oniofchaos: You can put this declaration in a class to move it off the stack. –  wallyk Oct 2 '12 at 17:55
1  
@wallyk Simply wrapping it with a class will not move it off the stack: it's the new operator that replaces stack allocation with dynamic allocation. You could stuff the new operator into the wrapper's constructor though. –  anatolyg Oct 2 '12 at 18:47
    
@anatolyg, that is exactly what I am doing! I just didn't notate that in my post, my bad. –  Oniofchaos Oct 2 '12 at 20:17
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.