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I'm curious what exactly the behavior is on the following:

FileInfo info = new FileInfo("C:/testfile.txt.gz");
string ext = info.Extension;

Will this return ".txt.gz" or ".gz"?

What is the behavior with even more extensions, such as ".txt.gz.zip" or something like that?

EDIT:

To be clear, I've already tested this. I would like an explanation of the property.

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10  
Did you run the code to see what it returns? Really really easy to do that since you already wrote the code. – Gromer Oct 2 '12 at 17:51
2  
Of course, I would just like the explanation behind what info.Extension does exactly, so I can write my unit tests around those assumptions :) – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 17:52
1  
For those downvoting - I'm not asking this because I'm too lazy to write my own tests, I'm asking because I wanted to know what was happening behind the scenes. – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 17:57
2  
I hear ya. If you haven't used it before, ILSpy is a pretty nice tool to check out what various .Net methods do. If can be slow sometimes, but it's great for seeing how parts of the Framework are written. – Gromer Oct 2 '12 at 17:59
1  
@Gromer I agree... also gives you a good insight into patterns and practices as well - so a good tool whatever you're doing. – Phil Cooper Feb 4 '14 at 11:31
up vote 23 down vote accepted

It will return .gz, but the explanation from MSDN (FileSystemInfo.Extension Property) isn't clear why:

"The Extension property returns the FileSystemInfo extension, including the period (.). For example, for a file c:\NewFile.txt, this property returns ".txt"."

So I looked up the code of the Extension property with reflector:

public string Extension
{
    get
    {
        int length = this.FullPath.Length;
        int startIndex = length;
        while (--startIndex >= 0)
        {
            char ch = this.FullPath[startIndex];
            if (ch == '.')
            {
                return this.FullPath.Substring(startIndex, length - startIndex);
            }
            if (((ch == Path.DirectorySeparatorChar) || (ch == Path.AltDirectorySeparatorChar)) || (ch == Path.VolumeSeparatorChar))
            {
                break;
            }
        }
        return string.Empty;
    }
}

It's check every char from the end of the filepath till it finds a dot, then a substring is returned from the dot to the end of the filepath.

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1  
Excellent, this is exactly what I was looking for, thank you! – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 17:55
    
That's an implementation detail, not something you should rely upon. What you should rely upon is documentation. Implementation details are subject to change. – hvd Oct 2 '12 at 17:58
    
@hvd the documentation is not clear on the behavior in this case. From MSDN: The Extension property returns the FileSystemInfo extension, including the period (.). For example, for a file c:\NewFile.txt, this property returns ".txt". – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 18:02
    
@Pheonixblade9 I know, I'm trying to find documentation that does answer the question. :) – hvd Oct 2 '12 at 18:03
1  
It seems perfectly clear to me. It returns the "extension". What's not clear? I don't understand the confusion. – Chris Dunaway Oct 2 '12 at 21:35
[TestCase(@"C:/testfile.txt.gz", ".gz")]
[TestCase(@"C:/testfile.txt.gz.zip", ".zip")]
[TestCase(@"C:/testfile.txt.gz.SO.jpg", ".jpg")]
public void TestName(string fileName, string expected)
{
    FileInfo info = new FileInfo(fileName);
    string actual = info.Extension;
    Assert.AreEqual(actual, expected);
}

All pass

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It returns the extension from the last dot, because it can't guess whether another part of the filename is part of the extension. In the case of testfile.txt.gz, you could argue that the extension is .txt.gz, but what about System.Data.dll? Should the extension be .Data.dll? Probably not... There's no way to guess, so the Extension property doesn't try to.

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Does Windows specify anywhere that extensions can contain a period? I've never seen that so I would assume that the extension is anything after the last period. – Chris Dunaway Oct 2 '12 at 21:37

I quick try in Visual Studio shows that it just returns .gz.

Here's what ILSpy tells me that property returns (as defined in and inherit from the System.IO.FileSystemInfo class). It looks like it starts at the end of the path and travels in reverse looking for a .... as soon as it finds one, it's found the extension. Done!~

public string Extension {
  get {
    int length = this.FullPath.Length;
    int num = length;
    while (--num >= 0) {
      char c = this.FullPath[num];
      if (c == '.') { 
        return this.FullPath.Substring(num, length - num);
      }
      if (c == Path.DirectorySeparatorChar || 
          c == Path.AltDirectorySeparatorChar || 
          c == Path.VolumeSeparatorChar) {
        break;
      }
    }
  return string.Empty;
  }
}
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This is tagged as a C# question, not VB. Thanks though – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 17:58
    
There you go ;) – Jeff Bridgman Oct 2 '12 at 18:01
    
Ninja edit! :D Thanks, I will have to try ILSpy sometime, this is great – Codeman Oct 2 '12 at 18:02
    
Yup, it's an awesome tool! – Jeff Bridgman Oct 2 '12 at 18:04
    
@Pheonixblade9 DotPeek has really nice integration in Resharper/Visual studio. RMB on any class/method and chose navigate to decompiled sources. – Johan Larsson Oct 2 '12 at 18:19

The file extension starts at the last dot. Unfortunately, the documentation for FileSystemInfo.Extension doesn't answer that, but it logically must return the same value as Path.GetExtension, for which the documentation states:

Remarks

The extension of path is obtained by searching path for a period (.), starting with the last character in path and continuing toward the start of path. If a period is found before a DirectorySeparatorChar or AltDirectorySeparatorChar character, the returned string contains the period and the characters after it; otherwise, Empty is returned.

For a list of common I/O tasks, see Common I/O Tasks.

It would be nice there is an authoritative answer on file names in general, but I'm having trouble finding it.

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