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I'm trying to position a check-mark next to a menu item by doing the following:

#userInfo div.dropDownContent p span
{
    position: absolute;
    margin-left: -20px;
}

A span inside a paragraph is absolutely positioned in order to preserve the centering of the menu item's text, otherwise the check-mark is centered along with the text and it makes it look bad.

As you can see in this jsFiddle, the check-mark looks ok in your average Windows browser, but Safari on Mac and iPad (perhaps even Chrome on Mac) shows the check-mark outside the menu, and there's nothing I can do to make it move even a pixel.

Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong? Is it a webkit bug? Thanks.

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Looks okay to me, Chrome 22.0.1229.79/Mac. –  chipcullen Oct 2 '12 at 17:58
    
I think it's just Safari then. Chrome does show this behavior, but only on iPad, since it's pretty much just a repackaged Safari. –  JayPea Oct 2 '12 at 18:04
    
Yeah, I see that in Safari. See answer below. –  chipcullen Oct 2 '12 at 18:09
    
Can you even give inline elements a position? –  iambriansreed Oct 2 '12 at 18:15
    
@iambriansreed I'm not sure, I thought that maybe the glitch was caused by invalid HTML or CSS. Setting display: block to the inline elements doesn't help though. –  JayPea Oct 2 '12 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

I do see that odd behavior in Safari, and I really can't explain why it's in that browser only.

That being said, this updated fiddle should show you what worked for me.

Basically, instead of positioning the span absolutely, I used relative positioning and set it to left -20px like so:

#userInfo div.dropDownContent p span
{
    position: relative;
    left: -20px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Unfortunately this affects the centering of the menu item, which is what I was trying to avoid. I'll see if I can do something to the text itself in order to compensate for the check-mark's width. –  JayPea Oct 2 '12 at 18:22

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