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Please tell me why the output is as below for the following program. I am not getting the virtual classes in c++. observe the below code:

class B
{
public:
    B(char c = 'a') : m_c(c) {}

public:
    char get_c() const { return m_c; }
    void set_c(char c) { m_c = c; }

private:
    char m_c;
};

class C: public B
{ };

class D: public B
{ };

class E
    : public C
    , public D
{ };

int main()
{
    E e;
    C &c = e;
    D &d = e;
    std::cout << c.get_c();
    d.set_c('b');
    std::cout << c.get_c() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

O/P: aa I expect output would be ab. What would be the reason for getting "aa"??

If i have c.set_c('b') instead of d.set_c('b') then I will get O/P : "ab", Here also, I am not getting why is it as such. Both c, d are referring to one object only.

class C:virtual public B{};
class D:virtual public B{};

If the class C, class D are inherited virtually from B, then O/P would always be "ab"

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3  
With 11 questions and no accepted answer you should consider yourself happy to get answer at all. Please go over your old questions and mark the answers you used as accepted by click the "tick" next to that answer. Doing this will raise your accept rate and make people more willing to answer you in the future. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 2 '12 at 18:10
    
C++ doesn't have "virtual classes". We have "virtual inheritence", and "virtual functions" –  Mooing Duck Oct 2 '12 at 18:12
3  
The perplexing thing is the second code snippet contains the answer to his dilemma, but the primary code sample doesn't use it. I.e. the OP answered his own question without putting it into practice. –  WhozCraig Oct 2 '12 at 18:20
    
thanks for your suggeston, I dont know that we have to accept it . I simply followed your answers. Sorry for that. I will accept now onwards –  ranganath111 Oct 2 '12 at 18:23
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

consider class C : public B and C* c = new C then c point to an storage that begin with a B since C* is also B*. and this is true for class D : public B.

Now for class E : public C, public D and E* e = new E(). memory of e is something like:

{| B of C | other members of C }{| B of D | other members of D}

as you can see in above case we have 2 instance of B one for C and another for D and now it is obvious when you call ((D*)e)->set_c( 'b' ) you only change B instance of D and B instance of C will remain unchanged.

now when you say class C : public virtual B, C++ share B instance with any other class that virtually inherit from B. so in this case e is something like:

           | shared B |
    | C members | | D members |

and as you can see we have only one B so calling ((C*)e)->set_c and ((D*)e)->set_c will both act on same B.

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too good explantion..Thanks alot. I got it exactly, –  ranganath111 Oct 2 '12 at 19:10
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There are two copies of B in E, one via C and one via D. When you call d.set_c('b'), you're modifying the m_c in D's B. When you call c.get_c(), you then get the m_c in C's B, which hasn't changed.

When you make C and D inherit from B virtually, it solves the problem, because then there's only one copy of B in E.

This is relevant: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/virtual-inheritance-where.html

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1  
Beat me by a second, +1 :) –  Seth Carnegie Oct 2 '12 at 18:10
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I'm not sure I understand the problem but your question contains the answer, declare B as a virtual base to both C and D and you get.

#include <iostream>

class B
{
public:
    B(char c = 'a') : m_c(c) {}

public:
    char get_c() const { return m_c; }
    void set_c(char c) { m_c = c; }

private:
    char m_c;
};

// note virtual inheritance
class C: virtual public B
{ };

// note virtual inheritance
class D: virtual public B
{ };

class E
: public C
, public D
{ };

int main()
{
    E e;
    C &c = e;
    D &d = e;
    std::cout << c.get_c() << std::endl;;
    d.set_c('d');
    std::cout << c.get_c() << std::endl;
    c.set_c('c');
    std::cout << d.get_c() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

which results in the output you want , doesn't it ??

a
d
c
share|improve this answer
    
this is because of virtual inheritance. But if it is not inherited virtually, then two copies are existed in the single object. –  ranganath111 Oct 2 '12 at 18:27
    
yeah, that would be why I put this here, and commented on the OP's mentioning it in his very question, then disregarding his own code and not doing it. This is how it is supposed to be done if you want a shared base instance, the question demonstrates knowledge of that, and then promptly didn't code it, which I found odd. –  WhozCraig Oct 2 '12 at 20:56
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