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I wrote the following function:

template< class C, typename T, typename U >
void addVarCB(C * _this, const std::string &name, 
    T(C::*getter)(void) const, U(C::*setter)(const T&), const std::string &def);

Then I realized that it wont work if setter takes a T as input, so I overloaded the function:

template< class C, typename T, typename U >
void addVarCB(C * _this, const std::string &name, 
T(C::*getter)(void) const, U(C::*setter)(T), const std::string &def = "");

And now I am realizing that even this will fail if the getter returns

const T &
T &
const T *
T *
const T // yeah this is dumb but someone on my team wrote code like this...

Am I doomed to copying the same code all over the place? Hopefully at least solution just for the reference versions?

Note that the function takes a this pointer to an object, a getter and a setter public member functions. The function will then interface with a GUI allowing the getter and setter to be called back later.

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2 Answers 2

Some template metaprogramming could solve your problem: (The following requires C++11 but the same can be achieved using boost)

#include<string>
#include<type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct BaseType {
    typedef typename std::remove_const<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>::type type;
};

struct MyClass{
    int a;
    std::string s;
    const int & getA() const {return a;}
    void setA(int a) {this->a=a;}
    std::string getS() const {return s;}
};


template< class C, typename Tget, typename Tset, typename U, 
    class = typename std::enable_if<
                std::is_same<
                   typename BaseType<Tget>::type, 
                   typename BaseType<Tset>::type>::value,void>::type >
void addVarCB(C * _this, const std::string &name, 
    Tget(C::*getter)(void) const, U(C::*setter)(Tset), const std::string &def = "") {
}

int main() {
    MyClass c;
    addVarCB(&c,std::string("a"),&MyClass::getA,&MyClass::setA,std::string("a"));
    //addVarCB(&c,std::string("a"),&MyClass::getS,&MyClass::setA,std::string("a")); // Compiler error
}

Here we simply let the get and set types (Tget and Tset respectively) to be deduced independently. We then strip those types of any constness or reference and check if they're the same; if not, we trigger a specialization failure using enable_if.

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Just make GetType and SetType independent template parameters, and let the compiler worry about whether they're convertible.

eg. this:

template< class C, typename T, typename U >
void addVarCB(C * _this, const std::string &name, 
    T(C::*getter)(void) const, U(C::*setter)(const T&), const std::string &def);

requires that setter's argument is a const reference to whatever getter returns. However, this:

template <typename Class, typename GetResult, typename SetArg, typename SetResult>
void addVarCB(Class *instance, std::string const& name,
              GetResult (Class::*getter)() const,
              SetResult (Class::*setter)(SetArg),
              std::string const &def);

allows the setter argument and the getter return type to be different. Now, assuming you want to pass one to the other, it'll only compile if they're convertible (or you could use C++11 or Boost.TypeTraits is_convertible to assert this explicitly).


... if that won't work, it would probably help if you show what goes inside addVarCB, or explain what you're trying to achieve.

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Do explain what you mean here, I don't have GetType or SetType anywhere. Furthermore, "T" cannot be deduced as "const T&" so changing T(C::*getter)(void) to S(C::*getter)(void) does not do anything... –  aCuria Oct 2 '12 at 18:40
    
@aCuria: T can very well be deduced as whatever the argument has in a T (C::*getter)(), including as a SomeType const&. –  Xeo Oct 2 '12 at 18:46
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