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I've noticed that many C/C++ programmers implement sets of flags using something like the following:

#define FLAG_1 (1 << 0)
#define FLAG_2 (1 << 1)
#define FLAG_3 (1 << 2)

unsigned int my_flags = 0; /* no flag set */
my_flags |= FLAG_2; /* set flag 2 */

But is this approach actually sound? It seems to me like it's making assumptions about the binary representation of unsigned ints that isn't part of the C/C++ language standard. For example, that "0" is actually 0x0000.

Am I wrong? Or am I right in theory, but not in practice given currently standard hardware?

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If you couldn't do what you suggest, what would you do? –  Greg Hewgill Oct 2 '12 at 18:24
    
I would make those expressions (1u << 0) to ensure that they are unsigned ints from the get-go, but that won't have any practical difference. –  Adrian McCarthy Oct 2 '12 at 18:26
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"that '0' is actually 0x0000." That's like saying that 5 is actually 101 in binary. They are two different representations of the same number. One is not "actually the other" -- they are the same thing. –  cdhowie Oct 2 '12 at 19:10
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Are there any actual implementations of C or C++ on non-binary computers? –  dan04 Oct 3 '12 at 3:33
    
@dan04: it wouldn't matter. Binary is still binary - irrespective of how the computer stores it. Your average modern cell in a NAND flash chip holds more than just a 0 or 1 - have you ever noticed it? no. –  Klaas van Gend Oct 3 '12 at 8:02

4 Answers 4

C++

The important part of the C++11 standard is §3.9.1/7 (ISO/IEC 14882:2011(E)):

The representations of integral types shall define values by use of a pure binary numeration system.

This is clarified in a footnote:

49) A positional representation for integers that uses the binary digits 0 and 1, in which the values represented by successive bits are additive, begin with 1, and are multiplied by successive integral power of 2, except perhaps for the bit with the highest position. (Adapted from the American National Dictionary for Information Processing Systems.)

The results of shift operators are defined mathematically. For example, for E1 << E2:

If E1 has an unsigned type, the value of the result is E1 × 2E2 , reduced modulo one more than the maximum value representable in the result type. Otherwise, if E1 has a signed type and non-negative value, and E1 × 2E2 is representable in the result type, then that is the resulting value; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

The bitwise operators are specifically defined as being bitwise. For example, for bitwise OR:

The usual arithmetic conversions are performed; the result is the bitwise exclusive OR function of the operands.

Of course, under the as-if rule, the representation does not truly have to be the pure binary numeration system. The compiler must only produce a program that acts as if it were.

C

In C99 (ISO/IEC 9899:TC3), pure binary notation is only guaranteed for bit-fields and objects of type unsigned char (§6.2.6.1/3):

Values stored in unsigned bit-fields and objects of type unsigned char shall be represented using a pure binary notation.

Again clarified in a footnote:

A positional representation for integers that uses the binary digits 0 and 1, in which the values represented by successive bits are additive, begin with 1, and are multiplied by successive integral powers of 2, except perhaps the bit with the highest position. (Adapted from the American National Dictionary for Information Processing Systems.)

The standard specifically points out that bitwise operations depend on the internal representation (§6.5/4):

Some operators (the unary operator ~, and the binary operators <<, >>, &, ^, and |, collectively described as bitwise operators) are required to have operands that have integer type. These operators yield values that depend on the internal representations of integers, and have implementation-defined and undefined aspects for signed types.

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It was <sup>. Thanks. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 2 '12 at 18:32
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Yep, the as-if rule requires binary behavior to be preserved regardless of the actual implementation. –  Ben Voigt Oct 2 '12 at 18:37
    
It seems like it says "have implementation-defined and undefined aspects for signed types", as if they're not undefined or implementation-defined for unsigned types, no? –  Seth Carnegie Oct 2 '12 at 22:34
    
Yeah, that statement is strangely worded. I couldn't find any clarification though. It's written as though depending on the internal representation isn't already introducing such aspects. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 2 '12 at 22:45

While it's theoretically possible to run C or C++ on an architecture that uses non-power-of-2 arithmetic, the |, &, and ^ operators are defined to have bitwise behavior, so such a machine would need to emulate binary arithmetic.

It's therefore completely safe and portable.

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The current C and C++ standards both limit unsigned integer representations to a pure binary representation, so what you have above is entirely safe and guaranteed to work.

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The observable behavior is that of a binary representation. I don't think there's anything that requires them to actually be implemented that way, as long as the observable behavior is correct. –  Ben Voigt Oct 2 '12 at 18:22
    
Except there is no need to define the flags as bitshifts, rather he should define them as base10 representations of the numbers :/ It looks a bit cleaner. –  ardentsonata Oct 2 '12 at 18:23
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@ardentsonata it's much easier to define them as bit shifts and there's no disadvantage. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 2 '12 at 18:24
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@SethCarnegie Don't you think having flags defined as #define NEED_MOAR 131072 is just so much clearer than 1 << 17? ;) –  Daniel Fischer Oct 2 '12 at 18:28
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@BenVoigt: A good enough imitation can get by under the as-if rule, but even in the C89 standard says (§6.1.2.5): "The representations of integral types shall define values by use of a pure binary numeration system." with footnote 18 further clarifying: "A positional representation for integers that uses the binary digits 0 and 1, in which the values represented by successive bits are additive, beign with 1, and are multiplied by successive integral powers of 2, except perhaps the bit with the highest position." –  Jerry Coffin Oct 2 '12 at 18:31

Bit shifting to the right always decreases the value of the integer, whereas bit shifting to the left will always increase the value. This is irrespective of the endianness of the machine, so to answer your question: "Yes, this is sound because bit shifting works the same no matter the endianness of the system"

Does that answer your question?

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You're forgetting overflow! –  ardentsonata Oct 2 '12 at 18:22
    
@ardentsonata: Shifting to the right can't overflow. (But the question doesn't shift to the right, so I don't know why this answer focuses on that) –  Ben Voigt Oct 2 '12 at 18:23
    
@BenVoigt If you shift right enough, it will overflow back to 0 wouldn't it? Eventually you're going to run out of bits to represent the number, albeit this is a huge corner case. –  ardentsonata Oct 2 '12 at 18:24
    
@ardentsonata You are correct. My mistake. Overflow can occur with left-shifting. I need to stop thinking in python ;) –  bohney Oct 2 '12 at 18:25
1  
@ardentsonata No problem, we're all confused sometimes, caffeine usually helps. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 2 '12 at 18:44

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