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I know about pivot and unpivot. That is not what I want. Pivot and unpivot aggregate data, but that is not what I want.

Think of a table as a matrix (linear algebra). If I start with an m x n matrix, I want to convert that matrix (table) into an n x m matrix. I want a true TRANSPOSE.

How can I do this in SQL?

For example if I have:

1  2  3
1  2  4
6  7  8
3  2  1
3  9  1

then the result should be:

1  1  6  3  3
2  2  7  2  9
3  4  8  1  1

Notice that the number of rows becomes the number of columns, and vice versa. Also notice that I have not grouped or aggregated any of the data. Every single value present in the source is present in the result, and their x-y coordinates have been swapped.

share|improve this question
    
can you post some sample data and the expected result? –  bluefeet Oct 2 '12 at 18:52
    
I am using MS SQL Server 2008. More details have been posted. –  mtmurdock Oct 2 '12 at 18:53
1  
@mtmurdock is there a reason why you think a PIVOT will not work? –  bluefeet Oct 2 '12 at 19:12
    
I know pivot wont work because this is not how pivot works. If you can show me a pivot that will do this, by all means. But I'm 90% certain it can't be done. –  mtmurdock Oct 2 '12 at 19:14
1  
I am not sure why this was closed as not a question. It seems pretty straight-forward to me. How do I transpose data is SQL? There is even an answer that has multiple up-votes and it solved my problem. –  Quesi Oct 5 '12 at 22:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I am unsure why you think you cannot accomplish this with an UNPIVOT and a PIVOT:

select [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]
from 
(
  select *
  from
  (
    select col1, col2, col3,
      row_number() over(order by col1) rn
    from yourtable
  ) x
  unpivot
  (
    val for col in (col1, col2, col3)
  ) u
) x1
pivot
(
  max(val)
  for rn in ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5])
) p

See SQL Fiddle with Demo. This could also be performed dynamically if needed.

Edit, if the column order needs to be kept, then you can use something like this, which applies the row_number() without using a order by on one of the columns in your table (here is an article about using non-deterministic row numbers):

select [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]
from 
(
  select *
  from
  (
    select col1, col2, col3,
      row_number() 
        over(order by (select 1)) rn
    from yourtable
  ) x
  unpivot
  (
    val for col in (col1, col2, col3)
  ) u
) x1
pivot
(
  max(val)
  for rn in ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5])
) p;

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow this is REALLY close. Well done. The only issue is that you have reordered the columns when you used order by col1 in your over clause. Any way to preserve the order? –  mtmurdock Oct 2 '12 at 19:15
    
@mtmurdock do you happen to have an id field on the table that places the rows in that order? Like a date or something? –  bluefeet Oct 2 '12 at 19:18
    
yes I do. Col1 is an ordered int. –  mtmurdock Oct 2 '12 at 19:19
    
@mtmurdock please see my edit –  bluefeet Oct 2 '12 at 19:27
    
Ok this looks great! I have no idea what its doing, but good work. I never thought to combine an unpivot and a pivot. I'm having a little trouble adapting it, but this should put me in the right direction. –  mtmurdock Oct 2 '12 at 19:35

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