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I have a dataframe with column headers.

How can I get a specific row from the dataframe as a list (with the column headers as keys for the list)?

Specifically, my dataframe is

      A    B    C
    1 5    4.25 4.5
    2 3.5  4    2.5
    3 3.25 4    4
    4 4.25 4.5  2.25
    5 1.5  4.5  3

And I want to get a row that's the equivalent of

> c(a=5, b=4.25, c=4.5)
  a   b   c 
5.0 4.25 4.5 
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 54 down vote accepted
x[r,]

where r is the row you're interested in. Try this, for example:

#Add your data
x<-structure(list(A = c(5, 3.5, 3.25, 4.25, 1.5), B = c(4.25, 4, 
4, 4.5, 4.5), C = c(4.5, 2.5, 4, 2.25, 3)), .Names = c("A", "B", 
"C"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -5L))

#The vector your result should match
y<-c(A=5, B=4.25, C=4.5)

#Test that the items in the row match the vector you wanted
x[1,]==y

This page (from this useful site) has good information on indexing like this.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm just assuming that the 4.5 in the c() is supposed to be 4.25 like in the data. –  Matt Parker Aug 13 '09 at 3:05
    
fixed the question - thanks much. –  Will Glass Aug 13 '09 at 4:51
1  
== doesn't test for equivalence - it's a vectorised test of equality. A single row of a data frame is not the same thing as a named vector (for one thing you can use $ with a data frame). –  hadley Aug 13 '09 at 13:30
    
Thanks, Hadley - need to be more careful with my phrasing (and, frankly, learn more about what exactly some of those operators do). I updated my posting to reflect your point. –  Matt Parker Aug 17 '09 at 0:54
1  
I really did not expected this behaviour - I mean if you do not type the comma it gives you column but with comma it gives row.. I guess I am too much used to python behaviour. –  Visgean Skeloru Mar 8 '13 at 21:52

Try:

> d <- data.frame(a=1:3, b=4:6, c=7:9)

> d
  a b c
1 1 4 7
2 2 5 8
3 3 6 9

> d[1, ]
  a b c
1 1 4 7

> d[1, ]['a']
  a
1 1
share|improve this answer

Logical indexing is very R-ish. Try:

 x[ x$A ==5 & x$B==4.25 & x$C==4.5 , ] 

Or:

subset( x, A ==5 & B==4.25 & C==4.5 )
share|improve this answer

If you don't know the row number, but do know some values then you can use subset

x<-structure(list(A = c(5, 3.5, 3.25, 4.25, 1.5), B = c(4.25, 4, 
4, 4.5, 4.5), C = c(4.5, 2.5, 4, 2.25, 3)), .Names = c("A", "B", 
"C"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -5L))
subset(x, A ==5 & B==4.25 & C==4.5)
share|improve this answer
    
do you mean this instead? subset(x, A==5 && B==4.25 && C==4.5) –  momeara Jul 8 '10 at 20:23
    
No, it should have been: subset(x, A ==5 & B==4.25 & C==4.5) –  BondedDust Aug 20 '13 at 0:24

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